Admission rush continues at Delhi University’s School of Open Learning

Kunal Sharma has 85 per cent under his belt and yet he came looking for an English (Honours) seat in Delhi University’s School of Open Learning on Monday.

Written by Express News Service | New Delhi | Published: July 31, 2012 1:53:32 am

Kunal Sharma has 85 per cent under his belt and yet he came looking for an English (Honours) seat in Delhi University’s School of Open Learning on Monday.

He could have joined a regular college,but he has other goals to achieve. “Since childhood,I wanted to be an actor. My parents have always supported me,” he said.

To chase this dream,Kunal enrolled himself in a three-year acting course in National School of Drama. But this,he feels,is not enough. “I need a regular college degree and,hence,I decided to study English literature. It will help me hone my language skills and,at the same time,I can read a number of classic English plays and novels,” he said.

Vikrant,a budding cricketer,wants to be a graduate as well as pursue his primary ambition —- cricket.

“I got 62 per cent in Class XII. I am planning to take admission in BA (Programme) in School of Open Learning,” he said.

Two years after she passed her Class XII,Khushboo Verma has decided to join School of Open Learning in its BA (Programme). “I studied in Kanpur till Class XII. But my family shifted to Delhi after that. We had no idea about the colleges in Delhi. So I started working in a call centre in Noida. I don’t want to leave my job and that’s why I don’t to go to a regular college,” she said.

They were among hundreds of students who thronged the counters on Monday. Officials said more than 80,000 students have already taken admission.

Classes for undergraduate courses in regular colleges in Delhi University have already started,but admissions in School of Open Learning are still on.

The School of Open Learning’s executive director,H C Pokhriyal,said the rush has been far higher this year compared to the previous years.

“The students can be divided into three groups: those who don’t meet the cut-offs in regular colleges; students who are pursuing other courses; and persons who are employed but want a degree. We follow an inclusive approach. A person’s score may not reflect his abilities. It should not exclude him from an institute,” Pokhriyal said.

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