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Urdu, Persian tough to understand, why use it in FIR, asks Delhi High Court

Referring to Urdu and Persian words used in the FIR, the bench sought an explanation from the Police Commissioner on “whether these words are of the complainant or the police”.

By: Express News Service | New Delhi |
Updated: August 9, 2019 9:21:30 am
delhi police, delhi police FIR language, delhi high court on fir language, delhi city news Delhi government additional standing counsel Naushad Ahmed Khan, appearing for the police, said the Urdu and Persian words used in FIRs can be understood by making a little effort. (File Photo)

The Delhi High Court Wednesday directed the Delhi Police Commissioner to explain why Urdu or Persian words are used in an FIR when the same are not used by the complainant. Observing that the FIR is not for the comprehension of the police, but for the accused and others involved, a bench of Chief Justice D N Patel and Justice C Hari Shankar said simple language should be used instead of “high sounding” and “bombastic” words.

Referring to Urdu and Persian words used in the FIR, the bench sought an explanation from the Police Commissioner on “whether these words are of the complainant or the police”.

“Why they (police) use words which are not spoken by the complainant. In fact, the FIR should be in words of the complainant. Too much flowery language is not needed, the meaning of which has to be discerned from a dictionary… The FIR is for the public at large. It should not be something for which one has to do a doctorate in Sanskrit, Urdu or Persian,” the bench said.

It said that the police should use simple language, instead of high sounding words and also asked the Police Commissioner to file an affidavit explaining the reason for the usage of such words by the next date of hearing, November 25.

Delhi government additional standing counsel Naushad Ahmed Khan, appearing for the police, said the Urdu and Persian words used in FIRs can be understood by making a little effort.

The court’s direction came during the hearing of a PIL by advocate Vishalakshi Goel, seeking directions to the Delhi Police to not put the mandate of using Urdu and Persian words in FIRs. The petitioner said that instead, the police should use simple Hindi or English language in FIR, so that it can be easily comprehended by public.

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