Singapore company to help parched Delhi recycle waste water

The Delhi Jal Board on Wednesday signed a memorandum of understanding with Singapore Cooperation Enterprise with an aim to recycle and reuse waste water in a major way to help meet the growing demand of the city.

Written by Express News Service | New Delhi | Published: June 21, 2012 1:03:28 am

The Delhi Jal Board on Wednesday signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Singapore Cooperation Enterprise (SCE) with an aim to recycle and reuse waste water in a major way to help meet the growing demand of the city.

DJB officials said the Singapore agency would set up a facility to recycle waste water at Coronation Pillar sewage treatment plant. This could add at least 40 million gallons a day (MGD) of raw water and ease the city’s ever-increasing pressure on existing resources,they said.

“But there will be no direct distribution of this water. It is done nowhere in the world. The treated water would be added to the raw water system of Delhi,” a senior DJB official said.

DJB CEO Debashree Mukherjee and her SCE counterpart,Alphonsus Chia,signed the agreement “to share Singapore’s experience in recycle and reuse of treated sewage and wastewater”.

“Singapore and Delhi have much in common in the water sector and recycling will help meet our growing needs,” Mukherjee said.

Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit,who is also the DJB chairperson,was present on the occasion. She praised the initiative in finding a solution to overcome the growing water scarcity in Delhi.

“We have to adopt the mantra of the three ‘R’ which is reduce,recycle and reuse of our scarce natural resources,” she said.

The project will be supported by Temasek Foundation with a grant of Rs 2.04 crore and co-funded by the DJB. Tenders would be issued by early 2014,officials said,for the project that has to be completed in the next four years.

This comes at a time when the city is grappling with acute water shortage and 40 per cent wastage in supply,a government official said. Moreover,the national capital has been dependent on its neighbours,Haryana and Uttar Pradesh,for raw water,the official said.

The volume of water in the Yamuna passing through the capital and the canals are governed by the neighbouring states,and there is no possibility of an additional source of raw water for several years to come,he said.

“With the city’s population projected to grow to 23 million by 2021,the water scarcity scenario remains a real concern,” he said.

The DJB on Wednesday was still grappling with the low level of water at Haiderpur pond,affecting supply to some areas.

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