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Tuesday, May 18, 2021

Almost 400 personnel on frontlines infected, Delhi Police makes push to vaccinate force

Senior officers said they are planning to get everyone vaccinated soon to ensure safety of their staff, many of whom work more than 12 hours a day at Covid hospitals and testing and isolation centres.

Written by Jignasa Sinha | New Delhi |
Updated: April 18, 2021 12:42:10 am
The Delhi Police said there are at least 388 police personnel who are infected with Covid at present. (File Photo)

Amid rising Covid cases among the force, the Delhi Police is set to vaccinate all its personnel by the end of the month, officials said Saturday. Police have deployed a number of officers at government and private hospitals to oversee Covid testing and treatment and ensure there are no gatherings outside the hospital.

Senior officers said they are planning to get everyone vaccinated soon to ensure safety of their staff, many of whom work more than 12 hours a day at Covid hospitals and testing and isolation centres.

Chinmoy Biswal, the Delhi Police PRO, said the first dose of the vaccine has been administered to 72,677 personnel. “Out of the total 80,000 police personnel registered for vaccination drive, more than 90% have taken the first dose. The second dose has also been administered to 56,113 personnel. We want everyone to get vaccinated soon since a majority of the force is deployed to curb violations in the city and ensure curfew,” said Biswal.
The Delhi Police said there are at least 388 police personnel who are infected with Covid at present. More than 15 officers are admitted to hospitals and are undergoing treatment.

Delhi Police Commissioner S N Shrivastava Friday said the rise in cases is “worrisome” and that police personnel must follow social distancing and Covid norms at all times while on duty.

At the AIIMS Trauma Centre on Saturday, 43-year-old constable Pawan Kumar looks after Covid patients and their families every day.
Kumar, who now works at the hospital for 12-16 hours every day, said, “We are only doing our duty. I never knew I was going to do this but now I help Covid patients get admitted every day. We take care of them, talk to their families and even provide them with luggage or essentials. I usually go home at 8 pm but these days we are called at 10 or 11 pm to help families and patients. We have to ensure that families don’t violate social distancing. I wear a mask and gloves all the time and stay in a different room at my house. I don’t want to infect my wife and children.”
Given the crunch in hospital beds, police personnel also help doctors and patients by keeping a tab on the availability and communicating it to patients.

Sub-inspector Narender Singh Rawat (52) is posted at Ram Manohar Hospital for around 15 hours a day.

“There are patients who come with ambulances and want a bed but there’s no vacancy. We talk to doctors and refer patients to other hospitals. I have to ensure the families and other people maintain law and order. Sometimes, people gather in huge crowds and create a ruckus… I intervene in such cases and stop them. I have also helped people in getting Covid tests. I’m lucky that I haven’t been infected with the virus so far. Our work is difficult because the cases are increasing every day and more and more families come here,” he said.

At Lok Nayak Hospital, a sub-inspector said he has to make hundreds of calls to patients, doctors and government officials every day while overseeing Covid ward arrangements. “We also have to help Covid patients whose families don’t live in Delhi. It’s a difficult job because I get calls at midnight about emergency duty outside mortuaries and emergency wards,” he said.

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