Parking charge hike hits political roadblockhttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/delhi/parking-charge-hike-hits-political-roadblock-5508347/

Parking charge hike hits political roadblock

Delhi Transport Minister Kailash Gahlot has written to the Transport Commissioner, asking him to “withdraw” the order immediately and terming it “irregular”.

Parking charge hike hits political roadblock
To park a car for four hours, the fee would be increased from Rs 10 to Rs 20 for the first four hours and up to six hours from Rs 20 to Rs 40, and for up to 12 hours, Rs 50 to Rs 100

Car prices might not increase next year, with the plan proposed by the three corporations to increase one-time parking fare taking a political turn on Monday.

Delhi Transport Minister Kailash Gahlot has written to the Transport Commissioner, asking him to “withdraw” the order immediately and terming it “irregular”.

The transport department had agreed to collect the increased rate after the corporations agreed to hike parking fee by the same amount and passed it in their respective houses.

Gahlot wrote that “UD (urban development), being the administrative department for the MCDs, should have notified the revised charges, as the transport department is only a collection agent on behalf of the civic bodies”.

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“There is no reference to parking lots under the control of NDMC and Delhi Cantt Board. Thirdly, opinion of the Law Department ought to have been taken before issuing this order. Fourthly, the department could not have issued this order without placing the file before the Minister (Transport),” Gahlot wrote.

A senior corporation official said the transport department’s role is limited to collection of money, and if the minister wants to revoke the order, it will need a lot of arm-twisting. “The decision to increase the fare was taken by the corporation based on an existing notification of urban development ministry…,” the official said.

An official from south corporation said the issue has now become political and will ultimately harm the city’s interests, as corporations need money to increase parking facilities.