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Monsoon likely to hit Delhi in next 24-36 hours, light showers expected for 2 days

On Monday morning, the maximum temperature recorded was 25.5 degrees Celsius, three degrees below normal.

By: Express News Service | New Delhi |
June 14, 2021 10:44:34 am
Monsoon delayed in Delhi, city to receive light rain on Tuesday: IMDLight rain or thundershowers are forecast in Delhi on Tuesday evening, but the arrival of monsoon has been delayed by a few days in the city. (Express File Photo)

With monsoon expected to hit Delhi in the next 24-36 hours, light showers and below-normal temperatures are expected in the national capital over the next two days.

The mercury is likely to remain below normal throughout the week.

Monsoon usually hits Delhi on June 27, but as per IMD officials, a low-pressure area and cyclonic circulation over northwest Bay of Bengal, an east-west trough running from south Punjab to the centre of the low-pressure area over northwest Bay of Bengal, strong south-westerly winds along the west coast, and an off-shore trough off the west coast mean that Delhi will get monsoon rains two weeks early this year.

Monsoon has already covered Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, parts of western UP, northern Haryana and Punjab. Over the next 24-36 hours, it is expected to cover Delhi, and the remaining parts of Haryana and Punjab.

On Monday morning, the maximum temperature recorded was 25.5 degrees Celsius, three degrees below normal. It is expected to touch 34 degrees in the afternoon and the city is expected to see light rain. For the remainder of the week, the maximum temperature is expected to be between 33 and 36 degrees Celsius.

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