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Tuesday, March 02, 2021

High diversity of birds, many rarely seen in Delhi, in Mangar area: Study

According to the study, the 219 species found in the Mangar landscape include 130 resident species, 53 winter migrants, 12 summer migrants, and 16 passage migrants.

Written by Sakshi Dayal | Gurgaon |
Updated: February 12, 2021 9:08:17 am
Mangar landscape, Aravallis faridabad, migrant birds in delhi, high diversity bird species, Mangar landscape bird species, delhi news, indian express newsThe study pushed for conservation of Mangar Bani and nearby forests. (Express Archive)

The Mangar landscape of the Aravallis in Faridabad has a “high diversity” of bird species, with 219 species in a 17.13 sq km area, reflecting its “high conservation value”, reveals a study of the birds by the Centre for Ecology Development And Research (CEDAR).

The study, which is the result of a year-long field survey and compilation of e-bird data, has been conducted by Misha Bansal, project assistant at CEDAR, Sunil Harsana, a researcher from Mangar village, and ecologist Ghazala Shahabuddin, who is also a senior fellow at CEDAR. It covers the Mangar landscape, which includes Mangar Bani — a sacred grove in Faridabad with an area of 2.66 sq km — and its surrounding forests.

According to the study, the 219 species found in the Mangar landscape include 130 resident species, 53 winter migrants, 12 summer migrants, and 16 passage migrants.

Among the species found, several are “rare” in Delhi, including the common rosefinch, black breasted weaver, and red munia. Five “nationally endangered raptor species”, including king vulture and Egyptian vulture, as well as six bird species that have been showing a “national-level decline”, including the yellow crowned woodpecker and short-toed Snake Eagle, were also found to be “thriving” in the Mangar landscape, states the study.

“The biggest takeaway from the report is the species richness in the Mangar area … Another important takeaway is regarding the kind of species that were found. There are several dry forest specialists… Most of these are not very frequently seen in other dry forests in NCR,” said Bansal.

Based on the study, the researchers have concluded that “conservation of Mangar Bani, along with the surrounding forests, contributes immensely to NCR’s avifaunal biodiversity”.

They, however, warn that this alone is not enough, stating that, “if the avifauna (birds) is to be sustained, it will not be sufficient to protect Mangar landscape” since “much of the bird fauna, particularly the raptors, are dependent on the continuous mosaic of forests, fields, and fallow areas… cutting across the Delhi and Haryana Aravallis…”

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