Dye Another Dayhttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/delhi/dye-another-day-2/

Dye Another Day

Quit wearing rose-tinted glasses. Get your colour fix this Holi with red auto rickshaws,pink tombs with black dots,and a gold and yellow Qutub Minar,maybe even pink roads. Talk asks experts in the creative field how they would like to change the country’s iconography with a different colour. This is what they share.

Quit wearing rose-tinted glasses. Get your colour fix this Holi with red auto rickshaws,pink tombs with black dots,and a gold and yellow Qutub Minar,maybe even pink roads. Talk asks experts in the creative field how they would like to change the country’s iconography with a different colour. This is what they share.

GR Iranna,Artist

The auto rickshaws definitely need a change. The yellow-black and green-yellow has been there for long now. It’ll be nice to have them in red. They’ll be bright and can be identified from a distance. I would have said yellow,but the school buses are already in that colour. Unlike the common perception,red doesn’t necessarily signify danger,that’s the impression formed over the years,with they way we have used the colour.

Suchet Malhotra,Percussionist

I was in Belgium and crossed a music shop which had a black saxophone with small bits of golden. The golden was so unnaturally minimal and I have only one word to describe it: sexy. I absolutely had to own a black saxophone,I did.

R Raj Rao,

Writer and professor,University of Pune

I can’t associate Pune with any other colour except saffron. In the ’80s,when the Osho Ashram came up,sanyaasis went to town with orange and red robes. I’d like to see all the saffron roadside shrines that characterise Pune to be splashed with green and pink. Green is the colour of forests and pink is the colour of queer passion. That would be a fun way of dealing with the hegemony of saffron and achieving integration.

KS Radhakrishnan,

Artist

I would like to transform the Qutub Minar using gold and yellow. As an artist,these are the colours I use most often in my work. The Qutub Minar has abstract geometry so I think that these colours would reflect even better and make a stronger impact. It’s an iconic monument in Delhi that people often visit,and I think that because these are also warm and friendly colours,it would draw even more crowds.

Nikhil Mehra,

Fashion Designer

I would like to paint the Nila Gumbad (the tomb on the Nizammuddin roundabout in Delhi) rani pink with a black dot in the centre. To me,rani pink defines the vibrancy of this country and the black dot represents the intellectual depth of the nation.

Saby Gorai,Chef

Though we have an abundance of most colours in food,I really miss blue and black. Apart from a handful of ingredients such as blueberries or squid ink,there are very few foods that are naturally blue or black. I’d love to be able to create dishes using fruits of that shade,like the ones shown in Avatar.

MK Raina

Actor and Director

Somebody should paint the roads in different colours. The uniform grey and black are very boring. Roads should have interesting patterns and colours such as green for a signal-free stretch or pink to indicate a school nearby. Roads could also be named according to colours. Those of us who despair reading lousy signages can simply follow the colour-coded lanes.

Hanif Kureshi,Graphic Designer

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Colour is a mnemonic device when it comes to transport across India and the subcontinent. The same object can imply a different geography or purpose,be it the Ambassador car which is white for ministers or yellow for Kolkata taxis. Without any colour intervention,we already have memory references when we think of a black-and-red auto in Dhaka or a green-and-yellow in Delhi. Colour can change the idea of an object,though they appear the same,they can mean something completely different.

Illustration:Hanif Kureshi