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Tuesday, October 26, 2021

DU admissions under first list end: 41000 students secure seats, 31,000 from CBSE

In a statement, university registrar Vikas Gupta emphasised that the university has not been favouring students of any particular board in the admission process

By: Express News Service | New Delhi |
Updated: October 8, 2021 8:30:33 am
DU cut off lists 2021: DU admissions under first list end: 41000 students secure seats, 31,000 from CBSEStudents wait outside a Delhi University college. The DU released its first cut-off list on October 1. (Express Photo by Praveen Khanna)

At the end of the first cycle of admissions for roughly 70,000 undergraduate seats in Delhi University against the first cut-off list, 41,211 candidates have successfully secured seats across colleges. The University added that it has not been favouring students of any board.

According to authorities, out of the total seats, 31,172 seats have been secured by students from CBSE; 2,365 from the Kerala Board of Higher Secondary Education; 1,540 from Board of School Education Haryana; 1,429 from CISCE; and 1,301 from the Board of Secondary Education Rajasthan. The remaining seats have been secured by students from various other state boards.

The total number of registered applicants was the highest from CBSE at 2,29,264. The Kerala board had the fifth-highest number of applicants at 4,824, Haryana had been second highest at 9,918, CISCE had been third highest at 9,659 and Rajasthan had been the sixth highest at 4,789.

In a statement, registrar Vikas Gupta emphasised that the university has not been favouring students of any particular board in the admission process. “Being a central university, the University of Delhi equally and uniformly values academic credentials of all candidates irrespective of their States and School Boards. This year too, equal opportunity was maintained by accepting applications based on merit only. The University of Delhi strongly refutes and condemns the falsity of news which is being circulated regarding favouring candidates from a few boards. Being a prestigious central university with a long legacy of quality teaching and research, candidates across the country aspire to study in our colleges, departments, and centres. It is our utmost responsibility to maintain justice and equity to all meritorious candidates coming not only from Indian states but also from abroad,” read the press release from his office.

This follows a protest by the ABVP-led DU Students’ Union on Wednesday against “inflated results of state boards”, stating that its demand is a “fair and just admission process”. Concerns about an uneven admission process have been raised because a large majority of seats in popular programmes which had a 100% first cut-off have been secured by students from the Kerala state board.

University authorities had met with ABVP representatives after their protest. “We had a discussion and listened to their concerns. We are seeking legal opinion on whether we can change our admission criteria, but it does not seem likely that it will be possible in this admission cycle,” said registrar Gupta.

There have been pushes and pulls over the process since the first day of admissions under the first cut-off list.

On day 1, the process had been halted for a few hours in the afternoon after concerns were raised on whether class XI marks should be included in calculating the percentage of students from some state boards. In Kerala, the state school board uses the student’s performance in class XI and class XII to arrive at the final board result while DU only considers the student’s class XII performance for admission. Some teachers and colleges had raised concerns over this and had requested that the class XI marks be included to act as “a scaling mechanism”.

After a meeting, the central admissions team decided there has to be a universal principle to calculate marks of all students, and since other boards like CBSE only go by class XII, only class XII marks should be counted.

On day 2, colleges sought clarifications of whether certain subjects by state boards should be included in calculating the best four percentages for particular programmes. The university’s ‘Equivalence Committee’ shared guidelines on which subject can and cannot be considered ‘equivalent’ to a relevant CBSE subject. Among others, it stated that the paper titled Accountancy with Computer Accounting taught by the Kerala board will not be considered equivalent to CBSE’s Business Studies; the Business Economics paper of Madhya Pradesh will not be considered equivalent to CBSE’s Economics; and Secretarial Practice of the Maharashtra board will not be considered equivalent to CBSE’s Business Studies.

[With PTI inputs]

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