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Tuesday, December 10, 2019

AAP govt introduces bill to scrap no-detention policy in Delhi

The AAP government’s move is against initial indications that it would seek to make the no-detention policy applicable only till Class III.

Written by Pragya Kaushika | New Delhi | Published: November 28, 2015 2:07:54 am
delhi, delhi education, delhi education bill, delhi no detention, delhi no detention policy, delhi news No-detention policy up to Class VIII is creating problems for such children who are not attaining minimum level of learning of appropriate class: AAP

The Delhi government Friday introduced a bill to do away with the no-detention policy till Class VIII. The Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education (Delhi Amendment) Bill, 2015, seeks to amend relevant sections of the Right to Education Act, 2009, to scrap the policy.

The AAP government’s move is against initial indications that it would seek to make the no-detention policy applicable only till Class III. The proposed amendment will be brought for discussion in the House Monday.

While proposing the amendment, the government wants to “ensure achievement of class appropriate learning level by every child”. If a student is deemed not to have achieved appropriate learning level in a class, he/she may be held back in that class.

Tabling the bill, Deputy Chief Minister and Education Minister Manish Sisodia observed some provisions of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education Act or Right to Education Act, 2009, were prohibiting quality education. “No-detention policy up to Class VIII is creating problems for such children who are not attaining minimum level of learning of appropriate class. These problems are realised when these children are promoted to the next class,” said Sisodia.

Citing data to support the amendment, he said, “For Class VI, in 2011-12, the fail percentage was 14. It rose to 18% the next year and became 25% in 2013-14. In Class VII, the fail percentage was 14 in 2011-12; and 16% and 24% in the subsequent years. For Class VIII, it (fail percentage) was 12% in 2011-12 and rose to 13% and 21% in subsequent years.”

Speaking on Continuous and Comprehensive Education (CCE), Sisodia said he studied the education model of developed countries and even they had not be able to implement this ‘noble’ concept in letter and spirit. “We are not yet prepared for the CCE model. We have not trained our teachers for it. We do not have infrastructure to support this concept… CCE is idealism. We will train teachers first. We are working on establishing a Teachers’ University in Delhi,” added Sisodia.

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