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Friday, June 18, 2021

Three in Haryana administered Covid antibodies cocktail

Haryana has started distributing this drug to hospitals across the state after the drug received emergency use authorisation to treat Covid-19 patients.

By: Express News Service | Chandigarh |
Updated: May 28, 2021 5:08:33 am
Haryana has started distributing this drug to hospitals across the state after the drug received emergency use authorisation to treat Covid-19 patients. (Express Photo by Kamleshwar Singh/Representational)

At least three patients have been administered monoclonal antibodies drug cocktail at Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences (PGIMS) at Rohtak in Haryana. The condition of all the three patients stated to be ‘good’ according to hospital authorities.

Dr Pushpa Dahiya, Medical Superintendent of the hospital confirmed the development.

Haryana has started distributing this drug to hospitals across the state after the drug received emergency use authorisation to treat Covid-19 patients.

Talking to The Indian Express, Dr Dahiya said, “We received this drug about a fortnight ago. Since then, it has been used on three patients only. One patient is suffering from liver cirrhosis, another is a cancer patient and another patient is in his mid-eighties. Till date, all the three patients are fine. We cannot say about the efficacy and safety of these drugs…it is being used as trials. Because it (Covid) is a new disease and we are just using these drugs..but, it is only given after taking due consent from the patient”.

Explaining further about the procedure used for identifying patients that can be administered monoclonal antibodies, Dr Dahiya added, “Monoclonal antibodies are to be given to the patients who are at risk but at an early stage of the disease. But, if a patient has Covid-19 for a longer duration and some issues have already been there; or the patient has already been administered Remdesivir etc, then this drug can not be given to him. In a nutshell we can say that it is to be given at an early stage of the disease. All the three patients were at the earlier stage of their Covid-19 infection. They are doing good so far. All the three are admitted in Rohtak PGIMS.”

“So far, Haryana has received 590 vials of the antibody cocktail of Casirivimab and Imdevimab that has been developed by Regeneron/Roche and is being marketed in India by Cipla. About 100 vials have been supplied to the hospitals in Gurgaon, Panchkula and Faridabad while Rohtak PGIMS got about 205,” an official of health department said.

“One vial can be used for two patients, who are infected with mild to moderate Covid symptoms but has a high chance of progression to severe disease. It is a single IV infusion and the patient is monitored regularly. The therapy aims to reduce hospitalisation among Covid-19 patients by 70 per cent,” the official added.

To assess who can be administered this drug, the state government has also constituted an expert committee that examines each and every case and then prescribes the drug.

Dr Dhruv Chaudhry, nodal officer for Covid-19 in Haryana and chairman of the committee told The Indian Express, “All three patients who were administered monoclonal antibody drug cocktail are part of the same family. All three have been discharged. They had come from Chandigarh.”

Dr Chaudhry added, “We have made our initial preparations and very soon more and more patients shall be administered this drug cocktail depending upon their condition. We have also prepared a detailed pro forma for the patients who shall be getting this drug cocktail. Also a detailed follow up of each and every patient who gets this drug cocktail shall be kept.”

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