From 2015 to 2016, traffic challans see a downward trendhttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/chandigarh/punjab-traffic-rules-from-2015-to-2016-traffic-challans-see-a-downward-trend-4498144/

From 2015 to 2016, traffic challans see a downward trend

Traffic cops attribute it to their road safety campaigns and rigorous challaning drives carried out in last two years.

THERE HAS been a fall in the challans issued by the traffic police in 2016 as compared to 2015. The traffic offences, which witnessed a fall in 2016, included driving without helmet, wrong parking, driving vehicles without high security registration number, using black film and tinted glasses, and unauthorised use of red-blue beacons. About 41,203 people were challaned for driving without helmets in 2015. About 35,712 were challaned for this offence in 2016. Similarly, about 13,622 people were challaned for wrong parking in 2015 and about 9,955 people were challaned for this offence in 2016.

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Overall, in 2015, about 1,58,811 vehicles of other states were challaned and in 2016, the number of challaned vehicles of other states was 1,17,983. Similarly, in 2015, about 3,23,505 vehicles were challaned and in 2016, about 2,58,524 vehicles were challaned.

The traffic police’s records of the past five years reveal that while 3.14 lakh motorists were challaned for various traffic violations in 2014, the number dropped to 2.91 lakh in 2015 and further to 2.58 in 2016. Consequently, the revenue earned by the traffic police by way of collection of compounding fee for fines has also witnessed a dip over the last two years.

The Chandigarh Traffic Police concluded its road safety week on January 16. UT Administrator V P Singh Badnore had directed traffic police to act tough against the traffic violators.

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Traffic police officials consider the dip in challan figures a result of their intense road safety campaigns and rigorous challaning drives carried out throughout the last two years. The other reason is their decision of not taking action against vehicles of other states except in the case of visible traffic violations.

SSP (Traffic) Eish Singhal says, “Indeed, our decision not to challan vehicles of other states except in the case of visible traffic violations is one of the prime reasons for the sudden fall in the total figures of challan fine. Moreover, motorists in Chandigarh are more aware of traffic rules and regulations now. It is a positive thing that the number of violations has reduced.”

The traffic police’s statistics reveal that approximately Rs 10.84 crore was collected as fine from 2.91 lakh challans issued in 2015. The amount earned in 2016 was approximately Rs 8.87 crore from 2.58 lakh challans issued.

Road safety experts and activists see this as an encouraging trend if the traffic violations are coming down in Chandigarh. Harman Sidhu, a noted road safety expert based in Chandigarh, says, “It is a positive development. It indicates that people have become more sensitive towards traffic rules and regulations. If the number of challans is lesser, it means motorists are following traffic rules.”