PGIMER headache: Biomedical waste piling up at institutehttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/chandigarh/pgimer-headache-biomedical-waste-piling-up-at-institute-5000492/

PGIMER headache: Biomedical waste piling up at institute

The biomedical waste is piling up at the institute as no firm has been coming forward to lift it for the last six months despite the institute floating multiple tenders.

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Bio-medical waste at PGI. (Express photo)

THE POSTGRADUATE Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER) which is battling biomedical waste pilferage at the institute is facing another problem as well. The biomedical waste is piling up at the institute as no firm has been coming forward to lift it for the last six months despite the institute floating multiple tenders.

Sources told Chandigarh Newsline that after implementation of the Bio Medical Waste Management Rules, 2016, under which an institute has to sell the biomedical waste only to authorised recyclers, no firm is coming forward to participate in the tender process.

“We floated tenders several times. But the response is very poor and no one is really coming forward. Recently, one Delhi firm had shown their interest but they also didn’t turn up later,” said a PGI official privy to the development. “It is becoming a headache for us because for six months, the waste has been accumulating each day.”

According to PGI officials, approximately 1,600 kgs of biomedical waste is generated at the institute every day. The waste is received from different wards of the institute at two central refuge (collection) points. The plastic waste is shredded and is auctioned while other type of waste is recycled at the institute itself. The biomedical waste which is auctioned and is now getting accumulated includes glass, needles, syringes and IV sets.

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PGI spokesperson Manju Wadwalkar told Chandigarh Newsline that “the institute is trying its best to get an authorised recycler through the tendering process, so that the accumulated biomedical waste is picked up from the institute and recycled”.

Sources at PGI said that the institute has now approached the UT pollution board to get a no-objection certificate so that PGI can be allowed to give the biomedical waste to common biomedical waste facility in Punjab or Haryana.

The north India’s premier medical hub is also facing complaints of biomedical waste theft from the institute. Following the complaints earlier this year, a committee which was tasked to examine the process of biomedical waste management could not find any culprit but had come up with several recommendations.

The institute officials said that they were now installing cameras around the biomedical waste storage sites, strengthening the security, raising the walls around the sites, to prevent any possible theft of the waste from the institute.