scorecardresearch
Follow Us:
Wednesday, January 26, 2022

Insomnia most common complaint with post-pandemic, routine stress

In a world that never sleeps, it is vital to recognise stress in its initial stages and seek professional help, so that long-term implications can be avoided.


Updated: December 28, 2021 7:50:04 pm
Dr. Harneet Kaur

Written by Dr. Harneet Kaur

It was 3.30 am on a Saturday morning when my work phone rang, waking me up from deep sleep. Answering it, I heard a voice that was new to me and quite in distress. This was a 37-year-old entrepreneur, who was working from home, managing personal responsibilities and professional deadlines, having no time to self. “I am very stressed lately if only I could sleep.” Although I managed her crisis for then and fixed an appointment. The words…‘if only I could sleep’, kept ringing in my ears. Her chaotic routine was not any different from anyone trying to live up to his/her potential, how many individuals pick the phone and seek professional help? How many have access to professional help? Sleep eluded me, as I kept thinking about these unanswered questions.

Insomnia is the most common complaint associated with post-pandemic and otherwise routine stress. Despite recommended 7-9 hours, it has become a luxury to unwind and relax with a good pillow time. People often associate poor sleep with stress, but stress and poor sleep are often part of a vicious cycle, which sometimes becomes difficult to break. Difficult, but possible.

To sleep better, one should follow sleep hygiene — have an organised timed routine of sleeping and waking up, avoiding caffeine, carbonated drinks, alcohol, tobacco, high-carb, sugar-rich diet, blue light exposure from laptops/smartphones immediately before bedtime. Activities like exercising 30 minutes daily, adequate bedroom temperature, regular relaxing activity (reading a book), meditation, yoga, deep breathing, and simple mindfulness are suggested. Avoid doing chores, snacking, browsing, in bed. Keep it as a dedicated place only for sleeping.

Routine stress can be managed by creating SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Timely) goals, some ‘me time’, doing preferred activities (running, walking, gardening, cycling, playing with a pet, reading, listening to music). Penning down your thoughts at the end of the day is an effective way to relax your mind and be free of anxiety. It is strongly advised to get natural air and light exposure daily to avoid feeling low.

In a world that never sleeps, it is vital to recognise stress in its initial stages and seek professional help, so that long-term implications can be avoided.

The writer is a consultant psychiatrist, Omni Clinics and Diagnostics

📣 The Indian Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel (@indianexpress) and stay updated with the latest headlines

For all the latest Chandigarh News, download Indian Express App.

  • Newsguard
  • The Indian Express website has been rated GREEN for its credibility and trustworthiness by Newsguard, a global service that rates news sources for their journalistic standards.
  • Newsguard
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement