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Chandigarh had Central Service Rules till 1991: Employees weigh pros and cons

There are still certain sections of employee unions who feel there are more benefits under Punjab Service Rules than under the Central Civil Service Rules.

Chandigarh, Central Service Rules, Employees, Chandigarh news, Chandigarh, Indian express, Indian express news, Punjab newsIt is stated that the move may help education and medical employees more. (Representational)

The Central Civil Service Rules that were applied to Chandigarh employees last Sunday by the Centre were in force up to 1991 in Chandigarh. Later, they were replaced by Punjab Service Rules after several demands and protests.

“From UT’s inception till 1986, there were Central service rules but pay scale was that of Punjab. In 1986, the demand to implement Centre’s pay scale was raised as employees felt that Centre’s pay scale and benefits were more. Then, in 1989, the Centre’s pay scale was implemented by the government. Later, due to changes in Punjab scale, it was felt that Centre’s pay scale was less and benefits in Punjab were more. So, a demand was raised to have Punjab scale again. In 1991 when Harmohan Dhawan was the Cabinet Minister and government was that of Chander Shekhar, the decision to implement Punjab service rules along with Punjab pay scales was taken,” said Gopal Joshi, union secretary of power department.

There are still certain sections of employee unions who feel there are more benefits under Punjab Service Rules than under the Central Civil Service Rules.
“Centre’s pay scale is less as compared to that of Punjab. Those who are appointed now will have Centre’s pay scale and existing employees (who have pay protect clause) will still have more salaries as Punjab scale was applied to them,” another official said.

It is stated that the move may help education and medical employees more. “Those under Group A, B or C may be happy that with Centre’s rules, the age of retirement has increased but the age of recruitment has come down. Teaching and nursing employees are happy as pay scales in their departments are better but that is not the case with other departments like power and police. Education employees are happy because the age of retirement in their department has increased to 65. Same for nursing employees as they will get certain allowances which are not there in Punjab service rules. However, for all other departments, there isn’t much to cheer as only the child care leave and retirement age has increased,” Joshi added.

Job opportunities may come down

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With Central service rules, the maximum age to apply for a job in Chandigarh will be up to 27 years. While Punjab service rules were in place, the age to apply for a job in Chandigarh had been up to 37. This rule will somehow cut down the job opportunities. MP Kirron Kher had got the age enhanced to 37 years and had announced it as her key achievement in the 2019 elections.

Also, now there won’t be city compensatory allowance as it was under Punjab service rules.

“Even in situations of death case, there is just 5 per cent ceiling in Centre which means several people will keep waiting once the 5 per cent is filled while Punjab doesn’t have this ceiling,” Joshi stated.

CONTRACTUAL AND OUTSOURCED EMPLOYEES

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This move won’t impact 20,000 employees hired on contract or outsourced by the Chandigarh Administration. While Punjab is looking to regularise the employees under its service rules, these employees won’t benefit as Central Civil Service Rules would be applicable to them.

First published on: 02-04-2022 at 04:25 IST
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