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92-year-old Jalandhar man reunites with Pakistan-based nephew separated in 1947

After meeting, while speaking to The Indian Express, Sarwan Singh said, “The emotions were running high on both sides as it was our first meeting, and in my mind Mohan Singh was still that six-year-old boy who went missing during the riots of 1947. He had come along with his six sons and three daughters, and we all had ‘langar’ at the gurdwara.”

reopen Kartarpur Corridor, Punjab government, Covid restriction, Chandigarh news, Punjab news, Indian express newsThey met at the historic Gurdwara Kartarpur Sahib where the first Sikh master Guru Nanak Dev spent his last years practising agriculture.

Waheguru has fulfilled all my dreams and desires, and this was my last and most-cherished dream which He has fulfilled today,” said 92-year-old Sarwan Singh after seeing his nephew, who went missing in the communal riots of 1947, for the first time in 75 years.

Sarwan Singh met his 81-year-old nephew Mohan Singh (now Abdul Khaliq living in village Chak 37 of Sahiwal district in Pakistan) on Monday for the first time after separation in 1947. They met at the historic Gurdwara Kartarpur Sahib where the first Sikh master Guru Nanak Dev spent his last years practising agriculture.

After meeting, while speaking to The Indian Express, Sarwan Singh said, “The emotions were running high on both sides as it was our first meeting, and in my mind Mohan Singh was still that six-year-old boy who went missing during the riots of 1947. He had come along with his six sons and three daughters, and we all had ‘langar’ at the gurdwara.”

He narrated his life in Pakistan and “also showed me the photo of his wife”, who is no more now.

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“Mein Kiha ki to Bauti Bahut Soni Labbi Cee (I told him that you had found a beautiful bride) as for us everything was new, including his marriage, because I saw him last when he was six years old,” said Sarwan Singh, who was accompanied by his daughter Rachpal Kaur.

“He is well-settled there and has a great family as all his children gave us a lot of respect. We clicked several photographs with each other and had a nice time together,” said a delighted Sarwan Singh.

“They were allowed to meet us till 3 pm, while our time was till 4 pm. So they had to leave an hour before us,” Rachpal Kaur said, adding that “we sat with each other for over three hours which is a lifetime memory for us now”.

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“If we get a chance to visit each other, we will meet again,” she said.

Sarwan Singh said, “Waheguru has His plans and He allowed us to meet my lost nephew at no other place but at the historical Gurdwara Kartarpur Sahib. I am grateful to the two YouTubers – one from India and the other from Pakistan – and Gurdev Singh – a Punjabi from Australia – who made this reunion possible. The two thumbs of my nephew on his left hand played a big role in the reunion.”

A Jandiala-based YouTuber Harjit Singh narrated the story of Sarwan Singh by interviewing him and highlighted the prominent identification marks on Mohan Singh’s body, including two thumbs on one of his hands and a mole on his thigh. Then a Pakistan-based YouTuber Javed Mohammad narrated the tale of Mohan Singh mentioning similar identification marks. These two stories were seen by an Australia-based Punjabi who managed to contact both the families and helped them reunite, said Rachpal Kaur.

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Sarwan Singh said that at the time of Partition, his entire family used to live at village Chak 37, now in Pakistan, and 22 members of his family were killed during the violence in 1947. Sarwan Singh along with other family members crossed over to Indian territory, while the missing Mohan Singh was raised by a Muslim family in Pakistan.

Sarwan Singh, who is settled in Canada, has been living with his daughter in Jalandhar since the outbreak of Covid-19.

First published on: 08-08-2022 at 10:01:02 pm
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