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Singer Lucky Ali’s land grab allegations are latest episode in three-decade-long Bengaluru property saga

The property saga dates back to the acquisition of over 150 acres of land in 1969 on the outskirts of Bengaluru by famous comedian Mehmood. The land was passed on to his six children through trusts created in their names

The property saga involves a maze of litigation that began when Mehmood’s children became adults – beginning in the 1990s. (File)
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Popular singer Lucky Ali alias Maqsood Ali, 64, created a stir two days ago by writing an open letter on social media to the Karnataka police chief, accusing the husband of a serving IAS officer, and his brother, of encroaching on a portion of his property in the Kenchanahalli area of the Yelahanka region in north-east Bengaluru.

Lucky Ali’s social media comments about the alleged land grab by a ‘land mafia’ are the latest episode in a property saga that dates back to the acquisition of over 150 acres of land in 1969 on the outskirts of Bengaluru by his father, the famous comedian Mehmood Ali, who died in 2004.

The land acquired by Mehmood was passed on to his six children through trusts created in their names on account of them being minors in the 1970s.

The property saga involves a maze of litigation that began when Mehmood’s children became adults – beginning in the 1990s. At the root of the cases that have been fought by the Ali siblings, among themselves and with third-party real estate developers, is the alleged sale of the entire parcel of land held by Mehmood’s family to two realtors in 1991 by S Raghunath, a General Power of Attorney (GPA) holder for the family.

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According to court records over the last three decades, members of Mehmood’s family initially challenged the sale of the land to the realtors but later arrived at a compromise in court in 2008 where the realtors – Green Orchards Homes Ltd and Yeshwanth Shenoy – gave certain portions of the land back to the family, including to a trust in the name of Lucky Ali and his brother Maqdoom.

Under the compromise deal, the realtors reportedly executed conveyance deeds in favour of Mehmood’s family members, and also third parties like the family of Sudhir Reddy, the husband of the IAS officer Rohini Sindhuri in 2011.

At the root of the current dispute are differing claims by Sudhir, his brother Madhusudhan Reddy, and Lucky Ali over ownership of a portion of land in the Vasudevapura region of Yelahanka. While the Reddys claim to have purchased the land from Mansoor Ali, one of Lucky Ali’s younger brothers, Lucky Ali himself has given GPA and property development rights for the disputed property to another realtor.

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While Lucky Ali and Madhusudan Reddy have filed a police complaint and a counter-complaint over the alleged encroachments into the disputed property in the last week, Lucky Ali’s brother Mansoor also filed a police complaint in October against his brother on the basis of a court order.

Mansoor has alleged in his police complaint that in 2002, his brother Lucky Ali falsely claimed to hold rights over a portion of his land and entered an agreement with a realtor for a Rs 49 lakh advance.

A number of cases are incidentally pending in the courts over the ownership of the disputed property and the transfer of rights or sale of the land that has occurred over the last three decades.

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Lucky Ali himself is contesting a cheque bounce case in the Karnataka High Court after he was convicted in 2018 by a lower court for defaulting on a Rs 92 lakh cheque given to a realtor in 2002 from whom he had allegedly obtained an advance after claiming to have rights over a property that was held in the name of one of his brothers.

First published on: 07-12-2022 at 11:19 IST
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