‘Fetus in fetu’ case: In rare surgery, malformed foetus separated from infanthttps://indianexpress.com/article/cities/ahmedabad/fetus-in-fetu-case-in-rare-surgery-malformed-foetus-separated-from-infant-5080958/

‘Fetus in fetu’ case: In rare surgery, malformed foetus separated from infant

Addressing the media on Tuesday, doctors at the Civil Hospital said that according to medical literature there are only 200 cases of this condition to have been reported world wide.

Fetus surgery, fetus in fetu, Gujarat fetus surgery, Indian Express
“On February 15, the baby was admitted to our hospital. She is recovering now and we will discharge her in a day or two.” (AP Photo/Representational)

A seven-month-old child with a rare case of ‘fetus in fetu’, carrying a partially developed 130-gram foetus, was successfully operated on at the Civil Hospital in Asarwa. ‘Fetus in fetu’ is a condition in which a malformed foetus is located in the body of its twin. Prinsa Rathava, Manisha and Motisingh’s first child, was operated on February 19.

Addressing the media on Tuesday, doctors at the Civil Hospital said that according to medical literature there are only 200 cases of this condition to have been reported world wide. Dr Rakesh Joshi, head of the department of pediatric surgery at Civil hospital, said, “In this case, the undeveloped foetus had a normal vertebrae column, brain tissues, head, limb buds and an anal dimple. The parents of the child noticed a lump like structure in the child but ignored it. This happened when the child was five months old. Since the lump was growing at an alarming rate, the parents got it checked in Vadodara and then came to our hospital.”

According to the doctors, Prinsa’s mother did not get a antenatal sonography done during her pregnancy. “On February 15, the baby was admitted to our hospital. She is recovering now and we will discharge her in a day or two. There will be no future complications in the case and she will grow up normally. The surgery was tough as the undeveloped fetus was behind the intestine and between both the kidneys,” Joshi said.

“The formation is caused by the incomplete separation of twins, which fails to grow and instead becomes an internal part of the healthy twin. It is not a benign condition but as the foetus grows at an alarming rate it starts putting pressure on the organs of the health baby,” Joshi explained. The surgery, headed by Dr Joshi, was done by a team of six including three senior anaesthetists. Joshi and his team had dealt with a similar case in 2015, in which a 500-gram foetus with a head and a feet was removed from the body of a seven-month-old child from Junagadh.