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Friday, February 28, 2020

Non-food credit crosses Rs 100 lakh-crore mark but growth at three-year low

Data from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) showed that during the comparable fortnight a year ago, non-food credit growth stood at 14.43 per cent.

By: ENS Economic Bureau | Mumbai | Updated: February 14, 2020 5:06:54 am
Bank credit, india Bank credit growth, Non-food credit, Non-food credit growth, Non-food credit news According to provisional data released by the central bank on Thursday, outstanding loans to companies and individuals stood at Rs 100.24 lakh crore on January 31, up from Rs 99.23 lakh crore at the end of the previous fortnight.

Even as credit owed to the banking system crossed the Rs 100 lakh-crore mark, the non-food credit growth slipped to an over three-year low of 7.08 per cent year-on-year (y-o-y) during the fortnight ended January 31, 2020, from 7.14 per cent in the previous fortnight. Data from the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) showed that during the comparable fortnight a year ago, non-food credit growth stood at 14.43 per cent.

According to provisional data released by the central bank on Thursday, outstanding loans to companies and individuals stood at Rs 100.24 lakh crore on January 31, up from Rs 99.23 lakh crore at the end of the previous fortnight.

The deposit growth in the banking system marginally recovered during the fortnight. Deposits with banks grew 9.91 per cent y-o-y to Rs 133.24 lakh crore during the fortnight ended January 31, up from 8.69 per cent in the previous fortnight. During the comparable fortnight of 2019, deposits with banks had grown by 9.63 per cent.

The credit deposit (CD) ratio for the fortnight stood at 75.23 per cent, slightly lower than 75.6 per cent at the end of the previous fortnight.

It is noteworthy that credit growth has been trending down even as lending rates of banks fell through 2019 following rate cuts by the RBI. In its latest monetary policy meeting, the rate-setting committee held rates while the central bank resorted to more unconventional means of lowering the cost of credit.

In recent years, banks have come to rely heavily on the retail segment to buttress their growth numbers in the absence of demand from corporates. The scenario is unlikely to change anytime soon, say analysts. In a note dated Thursday, Kotak Institutional Equities said there was little scope for borrowing by corporates for greenfield projects. “Expected disbursements in FY20, based on sanctions up to FY19, are quite low at around 1 per cent of loans. Corporates are focusing on reducing leverage levels and/or prefer buying out capacities through IBC,” the broking firm said. —FE

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