miscarriage

miscarriage News

Common causes of miscarriage: Here are things to know

About 10 to 20 percent of known pregnancies end in miscarriage. Take a step towards emotional healing by understanding what can cause a miscarriage, what increases the risk and what medical care might be needed.

Watch: Ted Talks on dealing with miscarriage

In these Ted Talks, the speakers urge people to break the silence around miscarriage and share their personal stories of coping with the trauma of pregnancy loss.

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Zika virus may cause miscarriages, stillbirths without any symptoms

A research has found that loss of pregnancy due to the Zika virus shows no symptoms but the virus can be a possible cause for miscarriages and stillbirth in women. The virus is also known for causing a brain abnormality in children.

Can Vitamin C cut harm of maternal smoking on babies' lungs?

For those roughly 50 per cent of pregnant smokers who will not, or cannot quit smoking despite all efforts, vitamin C supplementation may be a simple and safe way to help them and their babies breathe better.

British scientists allowed to genetically modify human embryos

The UK's fertility regulator, Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) gave the go-ahead for the controversial experiment to the Francis Crick Institute in London to provide better understanding of the reasons behind miscarriages.

Constables miscarriage case: IRB officers yet to send answers to questionnaire

The delay in sending the reply is said to be a tact to put pressure on the constables. The women police station officers will soon send a reminder to the IRB in this connection.

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2 women cops suffer miscarriage on ‘VIP’ duty; IGP marks probe

They had to go to duty at 7 am and stay in park till 7 pm.

Common painkillers linked to risk of miscarriage

Health: Pregnant women who use painkillers like ibuprofen,naproxen twice as likely to miscarry: study.

Kate Middleton ‘too skinny to have baby’ warns top UK doctor

The Duchess of Cambridge is on the brink of being too underweight to be able to conceive a baby.

Pregnant women given OK to drink a coffee a day

A new research found that moderate caffeine consumption probably won't increase the risk of a miscarriage or premature birth.

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