CAS Tears Narsingh Yadav Defence, NADA’s Credibility

THE ruling by the Court of Arbitration of Sport (CAS) that led to a four-year ban on Narsingh Yadav on doping charges is a stinging indictment of the manner in which a hearing panel set up by India’s National Anti Doping Agency (NADA) cleared the wrestler for the Olympic Games in Rio by accepting his contention that he was a victim of “sabotage”.

The detailed report of the CAS hearing, made public on Monday, concluded that Narsingh “was doping, not that he is a victim of sabotage”. The three-member CAS panel also observed that Narsingh had “intentionally ingested the prohibited substance in tablet form on more than one occasion”.

The panel said that the high test readings suggest that the banned substance was because of consuming “one or two tablets of methandienone rather than from a drink where the powder had been mixed with water”, as Narsingh had claimed before the NADA panel.

Dismissing the sabotage theory of Narsingh and his battery of lawyers, which was aggressively backed by the Wrestling Federation of India (WFI) chief Brijbhushan Saran and some top politicians, CAS ruled: “The panel found (the) sabotage theory possible, but not probable, and certainly not grounded in any real evidence.”

THE ruling by the Court of Arbitration of Sport (CAS) that led to a four-year ban on Narsingh Yadav on doping charges is a stinging indictment of the manner in which a hearing panel set up by India’s National Anti Doping Agency (NADA) cleared the wrestler for the Olympic Games in Rio by accepting his contention that he was a victim of “sabotage”. The detailed report of the CAS hearing, made public on Monday, concluded that Narsingh “was doping, not that he is a victim of sabotage”. The three-member CAS panel also observed that Narsingh had “intentionally ingested the prohibited substance in tablet form on more than one occasion”. The panel said that the high test readings suggest that the banned substance was because of consuming “one or two tablets of methandienone rather than from a drink where the powder had been mixed with water”, as Narsingh had claimed before the NADA panel. Dismissing the sabotage theory of Narsingh and his battery of lawyers, which was aggressively backed by the Wrestling Federation of India (WFI) chief Brijbhushan Saran and some top politicians, CAS ruled: “The panel found (the) sabotage theory possible, but not probable, and certainly not grounded in any real evidence.”

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