Amrita Dutta

Profile

Anuk Arudpragasam on civil war in Sri Lanka and the possibility of reconciliation
Wed, Nov 29, 2017

Anuk Arudpragasam, winner of the DSC Prize for South Asian Literature and more recently, the Shakti Bhatt First Book Prize, talks about civil war in Sri Lanka and the possibility of reconciliation

Who’s hiding behind Padmavati?
Sat, Nov 25, 2017

The violent assertion of Hindu masculinity is masked as concern for a woman

One son in Chennai, his siblings in Bengaluru, slain Taj staffer’s family rebuilds slowly
Fri, Nov 24, 2017

Rehmatullah Ali had emerged from the kitchen at the Taj when one of the gunmen fired and killed him. His children have now rearranged themselves around their mother.

In future, we’ll work with our hearts. A machine can never have that: Writer Thomas L Friedman
Sun, Nov 19, 2017

Thomas L Friedman on the future worker and why it is too early to write globalisation’s epitaph.

The man who saw the future: Yashwant Chittal and his place in modern Indian literature
Mon, Nov 20, 2017

Who was Yashwant Chittal? What is his place in modern Indian literature? As an English translation of his cult novel, Shikari, releases this month, a look at the life and times of the Kannada writer, who saw the “nightmare” of the city long before his contemporaries did.

200 people in Meghalaya seek to ‘opt out’ of Aadhaar
Wed, Nov 01, 2017

The committee includes representatives of the powerful Khasi Students’ Union (KSU), civil society collective Thma U Rangli-Juki (TUR), as well as other individuals and organisations.

‘We shouldn’t say Swati killed her child… hers was cry of desperation’
Wed, Oct 25, 2017

On August 27, a 7-year-old’s mother allegedly threw the child twice off the building in Bengaluru where they lived. Retracing what led to that day.

‘My poetry appeals to the villager living in the heart of a city dweller’
Sun, Oct 22, 2017

One of the most important contemporary Kannada writers, Chandrashekar Kambar talks about his faith in folklore, his difference with the Navya movement, and, his new novel.

If govt can’t protect (me), other intellectuals not safe in country: Kancha Ilaiah Shepherd
Fri, Sep 29, 2017

Threatened over translated writings, Kancha Ilaiah Shepherd discusses caste system and his work with Indian Express.

Who is afraid of Gauri Lankesh?
Sun, Sep 10, 2017

Journalist. Activist. Daughter stepping into father’s giant shoes. For Gauri Lankesh, who was killed in Bengaluru on Sep 5, these roles blended seamlessly. Yet, to many, these were lines she dangerously breached. Indian Express speaks to her friends and family to tell her story.

Gauri Lankesh murder: Her death meant no edition this week, spirits low, but fight not over
Fri, Sep 08, 2017

Gauri Lankesh Patrike was formed in 2005 after Gauri and her brother, Indrajit, parted ways over the future of Lankesh Patrike, the tabloid they inherited from their father, after his death in 2000.

Gauri Lankesh murder: ‘Murder of democracy, climate of hate, intolerance complicit,’ says civil society
Wed, Sep 06, 2017

Gauri Lankesh murder: Kannada writer Vivek Shanbhag said the murder of the anti-establishment journalist was a clear message “to shut up”.

An honour killing
Wed, Sep 06, 2017

What happens when a community turns against the writer who speaks for and about them?

Wellspring
Sun, Aug 27, 2017

Does the well have a future in Bengaluru, a city faced with an acute water crisis? We dig for answers at parks, apartment complexes and old homes.

Ant to elephant, Andhra to New York, writer maps caste
Mon, Aug 14, 2017

Sujatha Gidla, of ‘untouchable’ Mala caste, tells her story and that of uncle and PWG co-founder to global acclaim.

A day in the life of a tank: The last stand
Sun, Aug 06, 2017

Narayan Burli, an employee of the Defence Accounts Department, seconds the proposal to park the tank in faraway JNU in Delhi, launching into a short speech about how patriotic fervour has to be created in India where, unlike in Europe, “the nation is more important than the individual”.

‘When ultra-nationalism is on the rise, it divides citizens into those whom the state should be proud of, and everyone else’
Sun, Aug 06, 2017

Kamila Shamsie reimagines Antigone in her new novel, which is already on the Man Booker longlist. The Pakistani writer on researching Islamic State, the right lessons from history and watching Jhulan Goswami play.

As Elon Musk seeks to reinvent travel, Indian team in the race
Fri, Aug 04, 2017

Hyperloop is an idea floated by Musk in 2012.

Maid and unmade in India: Tripti Lahiri on her book on domestic workers in India
Mon, Jul 31, 2017

Tripti Lahiri on what doesn’t surprise her about the class war in Noida and her book on domestic workers in India.

Living to Tell the Tale
Sat, Jul 15, 2017

The horrors of domestic abuse and a writer’s determination to overcome it

Mission Impossible: A village in Kolar, Karnataka, stricken by drought for years, waits for rain
Sun, Jul 09, 2017

Once, Kolar was known for a network of lakes and a bountiful, if seasonal, river. The Palar originates in Nandi Hills in Kolar and flows through Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. It is now a memory in the district, its bed indistinguishable from the foliage all around.

Ruskin Bond shows once more the quiet assertion of a solitary man in his autobiography
Sat, Jul 01, 2017

Lone Fox Dancing is a meditative account of his life, lit up by passages of splendid nature writing and warmed by memories of people, both big and small.

Paper Backers: When You Have to Shoot 
Sat, Jun 03, 2017

The novel follows one among them, Karan, through his execution of 35 “encounters”, till the system flips a switch and turns on him.

Learn to Walk Alone
Sat, May 20, 2017

A boy waits for his father to die in Anees Salim’s funny, moving new novel.

A King Among the Ruins
Sun, Apr 30, 2017

In I Allan Sealy’s latest work, Akbar seeks a more corporeal afterlife — an iPod would be nice to have.

‘To be a human being is often to feel foreign’
Sun, Apr 02, 2017

Pakistani author Mohsin Hamid on his new novel, why we are all migrants and why he might write a children’s book.

‘We are still living in the ongoing aftermath of 9/11’
Sun, Mar 19, 2017

Sikh-American activist and filmmaker Valarie Kaur on the spike in hate crimes in the US and why they are inextricably linked to state violence.

The project of growth and its fair distribution is in danger: Pankaj Mishra on his new book and understanding the new age of anxiety
Sat, Jan 28, 2017

To make sense of the toxic anger around us, Mishra asks us to look at the “advent of a commercial-industrial civilisation in the West in the 19th century”; and the droves of “alienated young men of promise” it left in its wake.

To thine own selves be true
Sat, Dec 17, 2016

“His is the story of a genuinely many-voiced man. If it has a moral it is that each man must be true to his selves, plural.”

The Last Stand
Sat, Nov 19, 2016

An extraordinary debut novel about the Sri Lankan war offers redemption by its attention to the ordinary and the mundane.

Living History
Thu, Nov 10, 2016

During the run-up to the US elections, we had asked authors and artists about their opinion of the two Presidential candidates. Here’s what they had had to say:

‘The middle class cannot buy its way out of dirty air’
Wed, Nov 09, 2016

Pallavi Aiyar’s book Choked is an account of living in some of the most polluted Asian cities. The writer on the Delhi smog and what we can learn from China.

With ‘Pink’ and Chetan Bhagat’s new book, feminism is in danger of becoming cute and coopted
Tue, Nov 01, 2016

Both Pink and One Indian Girl are examples of how powerful male celebrities seem to be pushing the limits of what society concedes as women’s freedom.

Taslima Nasrin: Stranger in a Strange Land
Sun, Oct 30, 2016

Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin hasn’t visited her country in 22 years. But what good is a homecoming when there is nothing to return to?

‘I’m not one of those who think this is a triumphal epic’
Sun, Oct 09, 2016

Arshia Sattar on her Ramayana for children, and why the little ones will find the answers to questions of misogyny and violence themselves.

Do we really need to know the autobiography (and name) of an unknown author?
Tue, Oct 04, 2016

The common sense rebuttal to the exposé is, of course, to point out that it serves no public good, nor does it deepen the reader's appreciation of Elena Ferrante's work.