US Navy destroyer conducts operation in South China Sea

China has looked dimly upon the US operations, which it views as meddling in waters where the US does not have territorial claims.

By: AP | Washington | Published:October 21, 2016 10:27 pm
In this image released by the U.S. Navy, the USS Mason (DDG 87), conducts maneuvers as part of a exercise in the Gulf of Oman on Sept. 10, 2016. For the second time this week two missiles were fired at the USS Mason in the Red Sea, and officials believe they were launched by the same Yemen-based Houthi rebels involved in the earlier attack, a U.S. military official said Wednesday. According to the official, the missiles were fired early Oct. 12 at the USS Mason that is conducting routine operations in the region, along with the USS Ponce, an amphibious warship. The official said that neither missile got near the ship. (Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Blake Midnight/U.S. Navy via AP) The US Navy has now conducted four freedom-of-navigation operations in the past year in the South China Sea. (AP Photo)

A US Navy warship on Friday passed through waters claimed by China near disputed islands in the South China Sea, the Defense Department said. A department spokesman, Navy Cmdr. Gary Ross, said the destroyer ship USS Decatur conducted the transit operation near the Paracel Islands. He said it was conducted “in a routine, lawful manner without ship escorts and without incident.” The Paracels, a group of islands and reefs, are occupied by China but are also claimed by Vietnam and Taiwan. Ross said the ship passed within an “excessive” claim of territorial waters by China between two land features, although it did not go within 12 nautical miles of them.

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He did not specify where in the Paracels the ship sailed.

The US  Navy has now conducted four freedom-of-navigation operations in the past year in the South China Sea, where China has reclaimed land on a massive scale to assert its claim to disputed features _ mostly in the Spratly islands that lie further south.

China has looked dimly upon the US  operations, which it views as meddling in waters where the US does not have territorial claims. Friday’s operation comes a day after the leader of the Philippines, one of the six governments with claims in the South China Sea, announced during a visit to Beijing his nation’s “separation” from the United States, as it seeks to deepen ties with China.

Ross said the operation was unrelated to any such event.

He said the U.S. conducts these operations on a regular basis around the world. He said the operation “demonstrated “that coastal states may not unlawfully restrict the navigation rights, freedoms and lawful uses of the sea” that all states are entitled to exercise under international law.

“This operation was about challenging excessive maritime claims, not territorial claims to land features. The United States has been clear that we take no position on competing territorial sovereignty claims to naturally formed land features in the South China Sea,” he said.