United Nations gets release of 876 children detained by Nigeria military

This is the first time the UN has reported negotiating the releases

By: AP | Lagos | Published:October 29, 2016 7:31 am
nigeria, boko haram, nigerian military, nigeria terrorism, islamic terrorism nigeria, nigeria boko haram, nigeria army, nigeria abducted children FILE- In this Feb. 12, 2016, file photo, woman and children detained by the Nigeria army who have no links to Boko Haram sit under a canopy before their release at the Giwa military barracks in Maiduguri, Nigeria. The United Nations has negotiated the release this year of 876 children detained at a Nigerian army barracks holding suspected collaborators of the Boko Haram Islamic extremist group, the U.N. Children’s Fund announced Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Jossy Ola, File)

The United Nations has negotiated the release this year of 876 children detained at a Nigerian army barracks holding suspected collaborators of the Boko Haram Islamic extremist group, the UN Children’s Fund has announced.

The agency fears hundreds more children are still being held at the barracks in the northeastern city of Maiduguri, the UNICEF spokeswoman for Nigeria, Doune Porter, said on Friday.

This is the first time the UN has reported negotiating the releases, though Nigeria’s army routinely reports how many minors are among the hundreds of detainees it frees after interrogations it says establish they have no links to Boko Haram.

Some of the 876 children released since December had been living in areas held by Boko Haram and were detained when those areas were liberated, according to Manuel Fontaine, UNICEF’s director for West and Central Africa.

Porter said many of the freed children were under 5 years old, some still being breast-fed, and were detained because their parents were suspects. Nigeria’s military and police routinely lock up children along with parents suspected of a crime.

In the biggest single release negotiated by UNICEF, 560 people were freed in September, including 430 children and some of their mothers, Porter said.

Those detained have been held in Maiduguri, the city that is the birthplace of Boko Haram and the home of the Nigerian army’s Giwa Barracks. All of the detainees at the barracks are held because of suspected support for Boko Haram.

Ministry of Defence spokesman Brig Gen Rabe Abubakar has called the charges by the London-based human rights group “a distraction,” insisting that “our duty is to protect lives, and that is what we have been doing.”

Once freed from detention, the often malnourished and traumatised children face other challenges, Porter said. “All of the people who have been held in territories that were occupied by Boko Haram face a lot of distrust and fear from their communities, so they have been widely regarded with suspicion.”

Boko Haram’s use of child suicide bombers, often females, has contributed to the fear.

The extremist group’s seven-year uprising has killed more than 20,000 people, spread across Nigeria’s borders and forced 2.6 million from their homes.