Time to review past 10 years of change: Former Nepal King Gyanendra

While greeting Nepalis on Dashai, the main festival of Hindus in the country, the former king said though it was already too late, people must review the situation and make the actors answerable.

Written by Yubaraj Ghimire | Kathmandu | Published:October 9, 2016 3:44 am
Nepal, Gyanendra, Gyanendra, world news Former King Gyanendra. (Reuters File)

UNHAPPY WITH the current state of affairs, former King Gyanendra of Nepal has asked his countrymen to review the past 10 years of political change and bring its actors into account. While greeting Nepalis on Dashai, the main festival of Hindus in the country, the former king said though it was already too late, people must review the situation and make the actors answerable.

“Nepalese have been longing for peace, security, stability, development and prosperity,” said the king and what followed thereafter is a volley of questions directed at the major political parties, including the current ruling coalition. “Have the past 10 years brought about any positive changes in the daily life of the people? Have the nationalism, sovereignty, national unity and social amity become stronger? Has the pro-people governance replaced corruption, irregularities, red-tapism and culture of impunity? Has an environment conducive to development, construction and industrialisation been created? Has the national interest and self-pride been protected by formulating a mature foreign policy? And, have the Nepali youths been liberated from a compelling situation of having to leave their families and toil in the alien land? Has crime and criminals been discouraged?” he added. “What all has been done for the people during the period,” asked the king, adding it is already too late to have it reviewed.”

In fact, all the questions posed by the former king are in fact promises that the current political actors had said would be fulfilled soon after Nepal became a Republic.

Asking all Nepalese to stand united to safeguard the country’s existence, its self-pride and glorious history, Gyanendra said that was possible only through a national consensus dictated by national agenda and balance of power.

The former king added that state power, religion, culture and society are the permanent elements of a vibrant state and a common national agenda and power balance are the ‘mantra’ for arriving at a national consensus.

“If our religion disappears, our culture will be in peril and once culture disappears, our civilisation will be lifeless. And, with our culture and civilisation gone, we will cease to exist,” the King warned.