Jesus Christ’s burial place exposed for first time

The new finding of the surface of the burial bed offers an opportunity for researchers to examine what is believed to be the holiest site in Christian tradition and how it came to be so venerated.

By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi | Updated: October 27, 2016 7:58 pm
Jesus Christ, Christ, Chist burial place, Christ burial tomb, Jerusalem, Christ's burial place, where was Jesus Christ buried?, World news, Indian Express Speaking to the National Geographic, archaeologist in residence Fredrick Hiebert said that “It will be a long scientific analysis, but we will finally be able to see the original rock surface on which, according to tradition, the body of Christ was laid.” (Express Archive)

In what might be considered the most remarkable discovery in the history of Christianity, the surface of what is believed to be Jesus Christ’s tomb has been exposed by a group of scientists. The tomb is located in the church of the Holy Sepulchre in the old city of Jerusalem and had been hidden under a cover of marble cladding for more than five centuries.

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Archaeologists are still studying the surface. Speaking to the National Geographic, archaeologist in residence Fredrick Hiebert said that “It will be a long scientific analysis, but we will finally be able to see the original rock surface on which, according to tradition, the body of Christ was laid.”

As per Christian belief, Jesus Christ was laid on a shelf or ‘burial bed’ following his crucifixion in the early centuries of the Christian era. The new finding of the surface of the burial bed offers an opportunity for researchers to examine what is believed to be the holiest site in Christian tradition and how it came to be so venerated.

“The techniques we’re using to document this unique monument will enable the world to study our findings as if they themselves were in the tomb of Christ, ” said  Professor Antonia Moropoulou of  National Technical University of Athens speaking to the National Geographic.