Japan is sinking? Giant sinkhole appears in middle of busy street

In Fukuoka, near a commercial area, a gigantic hole swallowed a large part of a five-lane street.

By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi | Updated: November 8, 2016 11:13 am
japan-sinkhole-759 The sinkhole is 20m wide. Photograph: KYODO/Reuters

The residents of a city in Japan woke up on Tuesday morning to find a giant sinkhole in one of its commercial street. In Fukuoka, near a commercial area, where underground construction for a subway tunnel was reportedly going on, a gigantic hole swallowed a large part of a five-lane street near the city’s major railway station. The sinkhole, as reported by The Guardian, is said to be around 20 m in length and 15 m in breadth, and has disrupted the power lines in the nearby region.

Watch | Massive sinkhole causes blackout & disrupts traffic in

According to reports, the hole damaged the foundations of nearby offices, and civilians working and living nearby were evacuated. The hole also made it impossible for civilians to cross the road and caused massive traffic jams. There have been no reports of any injuries in the incident. According to the Guardian, the city administration believed that the ongoing underground construction could be the cause of the incident. A witness describing the events to a Japanese news agency said, “The electricity went off suddenly and I head a loud boom. I went outside and saw a huge hole.”

This is not the first time something like this happened in Japan. There is a similar video footage of a sinkhole appearing in a Japanese city due to an earthquake from a few years ago.  According to geologists, Tohoku earthquake in 2011 caused some areas in Japan to sink. The island nation is one of the most seismically active region in the world and has witnessed massive earthquakes every year. Among geologists and civilians, it is common belief that the country will sink into the ocean one day. Several books have been written on the phenomena. The 2006 movie Japan is sinking showed geologists and volcanologists predicting that Japan will sink within 40 years.