Former Sri Lankan minister’s son found dead in UK

He was the son of Sri Lankan politician Imthiaz Bakeer Markar, chairman of the country's National Media Centre – a project established to monitor the country's media.

By: PTI | London | Published:October 18, 2016 1:59 pm
Sri Lankan Imthiaz Bakeer Markar. Sri Lankan Imthiaz Bakeer Markar.

Son of a former Sri Lankan cabinet minister studying at the prestigious London School of Economics was found dead after a brief illness at London, in UK. Adhil Bakeer Markar, a masters student tipped to become future leader of Sri Lanka, was found lying unconscious in his room by his friends last week and later declared dead, police said.

He was the son of Sri Lankan politician Imthiaz Bakeer Markar, chairman of the country’s National Media Centre – a project established to monitor the country’s media. His father has also served as Sri Lanka’s cabinet minister of media. According to a report, the LSE student who represented the next generation of Sri Lankan political leaders, “was found dead in his room after going to bed complaining of a fever”.

Friends became worried about Markar when he did not answer phone calls. When they went to his dorm residence, they opened the door with the help of university officials and found him “sprawled on the floor”.

Markar had complained of being ill, but when he spoke with one of his brothers last Tuesday, had said “I am recovering and will be OK”. Markar was attending the University on a Chevening Scholarship, a prestigious award for future leaders funded by the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

He had just begun studying for a Masters in Comparative Politics in September. Last year, he had represented the Sri Lanka Youth Delegation at the UN. Other Sri Lankan youth delegates posted a video calling his death a “great loss for our nation and community”.

Scotland Yard is not investigating his death and believe it is not suspicious. His body was discovered on October 12. The LSE posted a memorial online.

“Sri Lanka lost one of talented young future leaders and academics,” wrote a member of the UK’s Sri Lankan community.