At Marrakesh meet, familiar rifts over Paris pact emerge

These developing countries, including India, have also been reminding the developed countries about their commitments under the Kyoto Protocol which requires them to make targeted emission cuts in the pre-2020 period.

Written by Amitabh Sinha | Published:November 12, 2016 5:27 am
Marrakesh meet, Paris Agreement, climate change, Paris climate pact, global warming, pollution, donald trump rule, climate change agreement, indian express, world news, latest news Indigenous people from the Mesoamerican Alliance of Peoples and Forests stage a demonstration at the conference in Marrakesh in Morocco on Friday. Reuters photo

Familiar faultlines have opened up in Marrakesh where negotiators are trying to decide on rules that will govern the implementation of Paris Agreement on climate change, with some developing countries complaining that developed countries were running away from their responsibilities in taking the lead to reduce emissions and provide finance.

These developing countries, including India, have also been reminding the developed countries about their commitments under the Kyoto Protocol which requires them to make targeted emission cuts in the pre-2020 period.

With the Paris Agreement having come into force, thanks to quick ratification by required number of countries, there has been some attempt in Marrakesh to hurry up with the rule-making exercise to ensure an early implementation. Countries are currently working on a 2018 timeline to finalise rules of implementation. There are suggestions to complete this work by next year.

However, developing countries like India have been arguing that rules of the Agreement must reflect the essential principles of ‘differentiation’ according to which developed and richer countries have a greater responsibility in taking action. Some countries have complained that many of the proposals for the rules currently on the table try to put similar responsibilities on developed and developing nations. Developing countries have also been demanding a roadmap to the USD 100 billion fund that developed countries are committed to mobilise every year from 2020.

As speculation continued over the likely impacts of the election of Donald Trump as US President, China Friday said it hoped that there would be a distinction between Trump’s campaign and his Presidency. It said its own actions and commitments to the global effort on climate change would not change irrespective of the decisions taken by the US administration under Trump.

Meanwhile, Pakistan, Japan and Australia also ratified the Paris Agreement, taking the number of countries having done so to 105.