Time magazine’s latest cover: Russia’s onion domes take over White House

The cover hints at the growing influence of Kremlin over Washington and puts into perspective Trump's recent controversies with respect to Russia.

By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi | Published: May 20, 2017 9:18 am
Time Magazine, Time Magazine cover, Russia and US, Time Magazine controversial cover picture, Donald trump, Putin, Russian Ties, Indian express news, India news, Latest news The May 29, 2017, edition of Time Magazine does not have any text on the cover leaving it to the readers to interpret more. (Picture via Time Magazine)

Time Magazine’s latest cover portrays ornate Russian onion domes, a representation of its architecture and of its orthodox churches, taking over the White House alluding to the close ties of President Donald Trump with that country.

The influential magazine’s cover on Friday hints at the growing influence of Kremlin over Washington and puts into perspective Trump’s recent controversies with respect to Russia. The US President purportedly, over the last week, revealed classified information to Russian officials during a meeting in the Oval Office.

Unveiling the cover on Twitter, Matt Vella, Executive Editor of Time, on Friday said, “It’s been a decade since Time did not have a cover line.” The May 29, 2017, edition of Time Magazine would not have any text on the cover leaving it to the readers to interpret more.

The cover comes at a time when former FBI director Robert Mueller has taken over the US Justice Department’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election campaign. It also suggests the ‘loyalty’ Trump had asked from the former FBI director James Comey at the January 27 dinner meeting.

Meanwhile, MAD Magazine accused TIME magazine of plagiarism and questioned the originality of the cover. It said the new Time cover is strikingly similar to its own cover that appeared in print on December 12, 2016.

“In 1952, Time Magazine called MAD “a short lived, satirical pulp.” Now they’re stealing our material! Honestly, we’re flattered, but we would have appreciated a credit — something like, “Idea stolen from MAD, which in 1952 we called a short lived satirical pulp!” Mad magazine said in an online post.

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