Tuesday, Sep 16, 2014

Shia fighters make show of force in Iraqi cities, ISIL seizes 2 towns

Volunteers of newly formed “Peace Brigades” raise their weapons and chant slogans against the ISIL during a parade in Baghdad Saturday. Volunteers of newly formed “Peace Brigades” raise their weapons and chant slogans against the ISIL during a parade in Baghdad Saturday.
Associated Press | Baghdad | Posted: June 22, 2014 12:30 am

Thousands of heavily-armed Shia militiamen paraded through several Iraqi cities on Saturday as Sunni militants seized two strategically located towns in what appeared to be a new offensive in the western Anbar province.

The capture of the two towns – Qaim on the Syrian border Friday and Rawah on the Euphrates river Saturday —  dealt another blow to Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s government, which has struggled to push back against Islamic extremists and allied militants who have seized large swaths of the country’s north, including the second-largest city of Mosul.

But while al-Maliki has come under mounting pressure to reach out to disaffected Kurds and Sunnis, the display of heavy weapons by the Shia fighters indicated that forces beyond Baghdad’s control may be pushing the conflict toward a sectarian showdown.

Sunni militants have controlled the city of Falluja in Anbar and parts of the provincial capital of Ramadi since January. The vast Anbar province stretches from the western edges of Baghdad all the way to Jordan and Syria to the northwest. The fighting in Anbar has greatly disrupted use of the highway linking Baghdad to the Jordanian border, a key artery for goods and passengers.

In Baghdad, about 20,000 men, many in combat gear, marched through the Sadr City district with assault rifles, machine guns, multiple rocket launchers, field artillery and missiles. Similar parades took place in the southern cities of Amarah and Basra.

The parades were staged by followers of Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, who once led a powerful militia that battled US troops and was blamed for some of the mass killing of Sunni civilians during the sectarian bloodletting that peaked in 2006 and 2007.

Police and army officials said the al-Qaeda breakaway Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, along with allied militants, seized Qaim and its crossing, about 320 km west of Baghdad, after killing some 30 Iraqi troops in daylong clashes Friday.

The officials said people were now crossing back and forth freely.

Chief military spokesman Lt Gen Qassim al-Moussawi acknowledged Qaim’s fall, telling journalists that troops aided by local tribesmen sought to clear the city of “terrorists”.

The mayor of Rawah, Hussein AIi al-Aujail, said Sunni militants captured the town Saturday. The local army and police force pulled out when the militants took control, he said.

He said militants ransacked government offices in the town, along the Euphrates river some 275 km northwest of Baghdad.

The fall of Qaim came as al-Maliki faces mounting pressure to form an inclusive government or step aside, with both a top Shia cleric and the White House strongly hinting he is in part to blame for the worst crisis since US troops withdrew from the country at the end of 2011.

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