Friday, Dec 19, 2014

Search for lost jet tests China, US capabilities

In this photo by China's Xinhua News Agency, China's rescue ships sail different ways as they conduct a search operation for a missing Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777, flight MH370. (AP) In this photo by China's Xinhua News Agency, China's rescue ships sail different ways as they conduct a search operation for a missing Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777, flight MH370. (AP)
By: Associated Press | Tokyo | Posted: March 18, 2014 2:55 pm | Updated: March 18, 2014 3:01 pm

Finding the missing Malaysian jetliner would be a coup for any of the more than two dozen countries out there looking. But for China and the United States, it’s a lot more than that — it has been a chance for the two rival powers in the Pacific to show off what they can do in a real-life humanitarian mission across one of the world’s most hotly contested regions.

The hunt has major ramifications for Beijing, which has been rapidly improving its military while aggressively challenging neighbours over territorial disputes. Washington is looking to prove it’s still the top dog to allies worried about how seriously it takes the threat China poses to the Pacific status quo.

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So far, neither country has come up with anything significant. But they have been vigorously waving their flags.

China has the most at stake and has been taking an unusually high-profile role. Almost immediately after Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared March 8, China dispatched its largest-ever rescue flotilla to the initial search area in the South China Sea, which Beijing considers its own backyard.

Missing Malaysian plane flew low to avoid radar detection

Beijing sent four warships and five coast guard and civilian patrol service vessels, along with helicopters and fixed-wing surveillance aircraft. Among the warships are two of China’s largest and most advanced amphibious docking ships. The 20,000-ton vessels are equipped with helicopters and a range of small boats, including up to four hovercrafts.

“On the one hand, China is simply doing its duty in orchestration with other countries,” said Ni Lexiong, a military expert at Shanghai’s University of Political Science and Law. “On the other hand, this operation offers an opportunity to assess the Chinese navy’s willpower, efficiency and ability to carry out operations far from home, especially in comparison with the U.S.”

Fresh off a massive relief effort after Typhoon Haiyan devastated the Philippines — which China barely got involved in — the U.S. was once again quick to respond. Within days, the Navy had two destroyers in the South China Sea participating in the search, the USS Kidd and the USS Pinckney. Both are both based in San Diego but were training in the area when the jet disappeared.

Since the flight was bound for Beijing and two-thirds of the passengers were Chinese, the public expects the government and military to pull out all the stops. With more Chinese traveling abroad than ever — 100 million last year, more than double the figure for 2009 — they are increasingly reliant on their government to assist and protect continued…

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