These astronauts have been doing YOGA in SPACE! The reason’s hilarious

The posture is supposedly the 'Half Lotus Toe Balance' or 'Padangustha Padma Utkatasana', and it requires a great amount of flexibility and muscular strength. That is, if performed on earth with full force of gravity. In space, though, things would be a whole lot different.

By: Trends Desk | New Delhi | Published:July 31, 2017 6:01 pm
yoga, yoga in space, international space station, yoga benefits, yoga in space benefits, astronauts doing yoga, science news, indian express American astronauts Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson performed yoga postures aboard the ISS and shared the photos on his Twitter account. (Source: Jack Fischer/ Twitter)

When Baba Ramdev or Shilpa Shetty flaunt their yoga skills and demonstrate the most unusual asanas, it seems quite doable, thanks to the ease with which they do them. But once you try it, and get going you realise how difficult it can be. However, there’s one place where any complex yoga asana is easy-breezy! Well, you might need to travel a lot, but trust the experts it’s easier doing yoga up there.

If you’re thinking about the your terrace, then think again. It’s not the North Pole or Mt Everest either. In fact, you need to go a little higher, rather much much much higher…into space!

We’re not kidding!

If not us, then at least trust these two astronauts who tried various yoga asanas at the International Space Station, and claimed: “yoga poses sure are easier without gravity”.

So, is this the reason why astronauts have become such avid yoga enthusiasts?

American astronauts Jack Fischer and Peggy Whitson performed yoga postures aboard the ISS and shared the photos on his Twitter account. Calling Whitson, first female astronaut to be at ISS, a “ninja”, he bet she could even do this on the ground with ease.

Many people on the microblogging site agreed with Fisher and vouched for it that “it’s impossible on ground”.

In case you are wondering what asana they performed how difficult it can be, check this out. The posture is known as ‘Half Lotus Toe Balance’ or ‘Padangustha Padma Utkatasana’ requires a great amount of flexibility and muscular strength. Of course, balancing your entire body weight just on your toes on one foot is difficult, and to make it hard, you are in a sitting position with your back straight! Hence, with zero gravity, it was easy to balance.

And before the rise of aerial yoga or antigravity yoga, surely there has been zero-gravity yoga. Yes, Indian astronaut Rakesh Sharma went on a mission in 1984 and performed three yoga postures in space, no kidding. According to a New York Times report, Sharma was to do “three yoga exercises, several times for five days, one for 25 minutes, one for 35 minutes and one for an hour, as part of an investigation of the effects of space flight on various bodily functions.”

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  1. A
    Anne Appleby
    Aug 1, 2017 at 9:24 am
    Proper body alignment is key! yogaforce
    Reply