Google celebrates 90th birth anniversary of Japanese statistician Hirotugu Akaike with an innovative doodle

Hirotugu Akaike way back in the early 1950s had questioned the precision of statistical models and had come up with the idea that someone ought to measure the measures since each variable is liable to have an impact on the outcome. Over 20 years later, he announced the Akaike Information Criterion, AIC in 1971 and later in 1974 published a paper.

By: Trends Desk | New Delhi | Updated: November 5, 2017 4:16:27 pm
Hirotugu Akaike , google doodle, google doodle honouring Japanese statistician, Hirotugu Akaike google doodle, indian express, indian express news Hirotugu Akaike was awarded the Kyoto Prize in 2006 for his immense contribution in the field of statistical science. (Source: Google)

Continuing with the practice of celebrating and commemorating famous personalities and dates, Google doodle on Sunday paid homage to Japanese statistician Hirotugu Akaike on his 90th birth anniversary. Akaike, the 2006 Kyoto Prize recipient had formulated the famous Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) which is used for statistical analysis.

The statistician has also won two of the highest honours in culture and science in Japan — the Purple Ribbon Medal and the Asahi Prize. The doodle portrays Akaike against a Google-inspired approximation of functions, parameters, and their respective curves. With Akaike Information Criterion, analysts can select a model from a set of options by evaluating and measuring how close the results are to the (hypothetical)truth.

Akaike, way back in the early 1950s had questioned the precision of statistical models and had come up with the idea that someone ought to gauge the measures since each variable is liable to have an impact on the outcome. Over 20 years later, he announced the AIC in 1971 and later in 1974 published a paper.

The Japanese statistician had bought a scooter and rode it around Mount Fuji for the purpose of the experiment. This close, first-hand experiment helped him to comprehend and differentiate between the vibrations of riding normal and heavy-trucked load. During his lifetime, Akaike held several visiting positions in different universities. He was at Princeton University from 1966-1967, at Stanford from 1967 till 1979, at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology in 1973, among others.

On August 4, 2009 Akaike died of pneumonia. He was 81 years at that time.

For all the latest Trending News, download Indian Express App

Share your thoughts
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement