Intel acquires Movidius, Google’s Project Tango partner

Intel has acquired Movidius, a computer vison firm that has worked with DJI, Google and Lenovo to give 3D vision to devices.

By: Tech Desk | Published:September 6, 2016 2:08 pm
Intel, Movidius, Intel Movidius partnership, Intel RealSense technology, Movidius low power chips, Augmented Reality, AR, virtual Reality, VR, smartphones, technology, technology news Intel Senior Vice President of New Technologies Group, Josh Walden with Movidi CEI, Remi El-Ouazzane.

Intel has acquired Movidius, a computer vison firm that has worked with DJI, Google and Lenovo to give 3D vision to devices. No other detail of the deal was revealed. According to Intel, the company plans to use Movidius’ low-power, high-performance SoC platforms for accelerating computer vision platforms. “Movidius’ technology optimises, enhances and brings RealSense capabilities to fruition,” said Josh Walden, senior VC and GM of Intel’s New Technology Group.

According to Josh, Movidius’ low-power and high-performance SoCs will help open opportunities in areas where heat, battery life and form factors are key. The Low-power SoCs have the ability to track, navigate, map and recognize both scenes and objects. “Specifically, we will look to deploy the technology across our efforts in augmented, virtual and merged reality (AR/VR/MR), drones, robotics, digital security cameras and beyond,” he said.

Movidius SoCs powers Lenovo’s Project Tango devices, which relies on Augmented Reality (AR) to accurately measure space, the area, and create 3D games like Jenga. The partnership was announced ahead of Lenovo’s Tech Show in June. Movidius’ Myriad 2, which is an ultra-low power chip powers Lenovo’s Project Tango devices.

The chip is specifically designed to tackle vision-based tasks like head tracking, gesture recognition, and can also blend multiple video streams into one interactive VR video. Myriad 2 uses low power (one watt) to offload all ‘vision-related’ task from a device’s GPU’s and CPU, thus freeing up the two units for other tasks. This helps in improving the overall performance.

“Our leading VPU (Vision Processing Unit) platform for on-device vision processing combined with Intel’s industry leading depth sensing solution (Intel RealSense Technology) is a winning combination for autonomous machines that can see in 3D, understand their surroundings and navigate accordingly,” Remi El-Ouazzane, CEO of Movidius.