Twitter accidentally suspends CEO Jack Dorsey’s account temporarily

Twitter temporarily suspended the account of its CEO Jack Dorsey in an embarrassing 'internal mistake'

By: Tech Desk | Updated: November 23, 2016 12:51 pm
Twitter, Twitter CEO account suspended, Jack Dorsey twitter account suspended, Jack Dorsey hacked, Jack dorsey twitter, social network, facebook, mark zuckerberg dead, technology, technology news Dorsey’s account was briefly suspended on Tuesday before being reinstated with less than 200 followers

Social media glitches are embarrassing for major social networking websites, but in a hilarious turn of events, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey found his Twitter account suspended. This comes just days after Facebook declared its Founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg dead on his timeline; along with two million other people on the social networking website.

Dorsey’s account was briefly suspended on Tuesday before being reinstated with less than 200 followers; which was eventually restored to his previous 3.45 million followers. Responding to his account being suspended Dorsey tweeted out, “just setting up my twttr…again (account suspension was an internal mistake)”.

Dorsey’s clarification confirms that his account was not hacked, but was suspended due to an internal error by the company. Dorsey’s account was hacked by OurMine group back in July, before he got back control 45 minutes later.

It isn’t clear on what grounds was the Twitter CEOs account suspended. The social network suspends Twitter accounts if a user is flagged by others, and the company finds them sending spamming or abusive tweets. Twitter also suspends accounts that have been compromised or hacked.

The website has been suspending several Twitter accounts that are linked to alt-right movement. The social network has recently also announced the expansion of its ‘mute’ feature for notifications, that it hopes to address online bullying, abuse and harassment. Twitter in general has become more active in suspending accounts that violate its rules, and is also getting tougher on how its data is used, according to WSJ.