Facebook Messenger chatbots will now accept payments

Facebook Messenger has rolled out the ability to make payments directly using chatbots without leaving the app.

By: Tech Desk | Updated: September 14, 2016 8:04 am
Facebook, Facebook Messenger, Facebook Messenger chatbots, Facebook Messenger Chatbots payments, Chatbots payments, Chatbots new feature, Payment on Facebook Messenger, Messenger bots, Messenger bots payment, Bots for messenger Facebook Messenger is bringing payments via Chatbots via Visa, MasterCard, PayPal, Braintree, Stripe and American Express on-board.

Facebook Messenger has rolled out the ability to make payments directly using chatbots without leaving the app. Facebook Messenger head David Marcus, at TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2016 said payments on Messenger will be facilitated by some of the biggest players in the industry. Messenger is bringing Visa, MasterCard, PayPal, Braintree, Stripe and American Express on-board, said Marcus. Apart from native payment option, several other new features for Messenger Platform v2.1 have been introduced by Facebook which makes the platform more seamless.

Another major change that comes with Messenger v2.1 is the rollout of ads in NewsFeeds. Developers and businesses can select the kind of audience they want to target for these ads. “Advertisers will now be able to select Messenger as a destination under the website clicks objective and use any call-to-action in their ad, including “Send Message”, to link to Messenger,” said Seth Rosenberg, Product Manager at Facebook, in a blogpost. The feature is expected to go live next month.

Next up, is the ability to share Facebook Messenger chatbots with friends. Starting today, Messenger will allow users to share chatbots with others using a share option. All of these messages will will have the bot icon, bot name and CTA that allows users to start a thread with a particular bot. Also, people can now share individual messages on Messenger using the share icon attached to a message bubble.

According to another Facebook blogpost, businesses have built over 30,000 bots for Messenger and the company has over 34,000 developers for the same. Marcus told TechCrunch, “While some bots – like those focused on delivering news – have done well, others have needed a lot of work to offering a compelling experience.”