Science in 140 characters: What scientists are tweeting about

It trended with a tweet by Dalton Ludwick, a PhD candidate in entomology: “If you could have the entire world know just one thing about your field of study, then what would it be? #MyOneScienceTweet.” The hashtag soon caught on with scientists, from biologists to astronomers.

Written by Harikrishnan Nair | Published: November 13, 2017 1:28 am
albert einstein, indian express Einstein and other scientists outside Mount Wilson Institute in 1931. AP

#MyOneScienceTweet @EntoLudwick
Dalton Ludwick, PhD scholar

It trended with a tweet by Dalton Ludwick, a PhD candidate in entomology: “If you could have the entire world know just one thing about your field of study, then what would it be? #MyOneScienceTweet.” The hashtag soon caught on with scientists, from biologists to astronomers. Some of their tweets:

“#Evolution is not improvement. Evolution is not betterment. Evolution is not progress. Evolution is change”
— David Moscato, palaeontologist

“Anthropologists did not stop using biological ‘race’ to be politically correct, they stopped because it is bad science”
— Tina Lasisi, biological anthropologist

“Speaking in a foreign language takes courage. Non-native accents are a sign of bravery. #SLA #appliedlinguistics”
— Michael Brown, linguist

“Animals talk to each other all the time, and talk about loads of different stuff. We aren’t that special!” — Arik Kershenbaum, zoologist

“Some fungi have more than 20,000 sexes. But we can’t tell them apart by how they look. Only the fungi know”
— Vaillancourt Lab, University of Kentucky

“Every one of the world’s 7000+ languages is an ingenious (& complex) response to the needs and interests of its speakers”— Alice Gaby, linguist

“Sharks are not a threat to humans, and humans are better off with healthy shark populations than we are without them”

— David Shiffman, marine conservation
biologist

Legend @ 100:

@Benhameen76
Benjamin Fagan, astronomer

On November 1, the historic 100-inch telescope at California’s Mount Wilson Institute turned 100. “One of the most important facilities in the world. #redshift #expansion #happybirthday,” tweeted astronomer Benjamin Fagan. Once the world’s largest, it is credited as being the first telescope to discover the universe; it was the first to provide a glimpse at what lay beyond the Milky Way. It was through this telescope that astronomer Edwin Hubble realised that what he had thought to be gas clouds were actually galaxies “moving away” — the basis of the theory that the universe was expanding, and eventually the Big Bang Theory. In time, however, the telescope was upstaged by the more famous Hubble Space Telescope. In 2014, the institute remodelled it to serve as an inspiration for young astronomers.

 

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