Annular Solar Eclipse 2017: When, where is the eclipse visible? What time does it start in India?

During the eclipse, the moon will come directly in front of the Sun, leaving the Sun's visible outer edges to form a 'ring of fire'.

By: Express Web Desk | New Delhi | Updated: February 26, 2017 5:57 pm
Annular Solar Eclipse, Annular Solar Eclipse 2017, Annular Solar Eclipse in India, Annular Solar Eclipse timing in India, Annular Solar Eclipse-ring of fire, sky watchers, solar eclipse, India news, Indian Express Despite being a natural phenomenon, many consider it as a bad omen or a supernatural event. Eye protection is advised if you are looking up to see the eclipse. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Sky watchers, brace yourselves for the year’s first solar eclipse. The spectacular phenomenon will occur on February 26 and will be visible in certain areas around the world. During the eclipse, the moon will come directly in front of the Sun, leaving the Sun’s visible outer edges to form a ‘ring of fire’. Despite being a natural phenomenon, many consider it as a bad omen or a supernatural event. Eye protection is advised if you are looking up to see the eclipse. The first eclipse of this year, penumbral lunar eclipse, took place earlier on February 11. It was visible in India.

What is the Annular Eclipse? 

The term annular has its origins set in Latin. It draws its meaning from the Latin word annulus, which means ring. When the sun, moon and earth align in a straight line, we have a perfect solar eclipse. The moon temporarily blocks the sun and from earth one could see the dark side of the lunar body.  The effect is know as “negative shadow”, or antumbra. The eclipses can last for less than a  second and the phenomenon is visible to the naked eye even from just one location.

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When is the Annular solar eclipse in 2017, What time does it start in India ?

However, there is bad news for Indian sky gazers as the solar eclipse will only be seen in South and West Africa, some of South America, the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Ocean, and Antarctica. According to scientists, the phenomenon will continue to occur for the next 60 million years, until the distance between the moon and the sun will be too vast.

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