Samsung reviewing ways to limit environment impact of Note 7 discontinuation

Samsung has said that it is reviewing options to limit the potential environmental impact from the discontinuation of the Galaxy Note 7

By: Tech Desk | Published:November 3, 2016 4:07 pm
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Samsung Electronics Co Ltd said on Thursday that it is reviewing options to limit the potential environmental impact from the firm’s discontinuation of the Galaxy Note 7 smartphones. The remarks come after environmental group Greenpeace issued a statement earlier this week demanding the world’s top smartphone maker find a way to reuse rare materials such as cobalt, gold, palladium and tungsten in the discontinued smartphones that Samsung is taking back.

“We recognize the concerns around the discontinuation of the Galaxy Note 7 and are currently reviewing possible options that can minimize the environmental impact of the recall in full compliance with relevant local environmental regulations,” Samsung said in a statement.

Samsung in October permanently ended sales of the fire-prone Note 7 smartphones and is in the process of recalling them globally. The firm had sold 3.06 million of the phones to customers before they were pulled from the market. Samsung did not refer to Greenpeace in its statement and declined to comment on what it plans to do with the recovered Note 7 devices.

Samsung’s CEO Kwon Oh-hyun recently said that the company needs to improve reeling from the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco, which has cost them billions of dollars and a serious hit in reputation. Samsung Galaxy Note 7 devices are banned from many airlines across the globe.

Samsung had to issue not one, but two product recalls for the Galaxy Note 7 after the pushed out replacement units with new batteries without properly determining the reason for the phones catching fire.

With Reuters inputs