Samsung Galaxy Note 7 fiasco: Here’s what has happened so far

Samsung Galaxy Note 7's battery has been exploding for users globally and the company has admitted to have come across more than 35 such cases

By: Tech Desk | Published:September 14, 2016 2:03 pm
Samsung, Samsung Galaxy Note 7, Galaxy note 7 overheating, Galaxy note 7 recall, Galaxy note7, Galaxy note 7 explosion, galaxy note 7 fire, galaxy note 7 issues, smartphone, technology, technology news, indian express Samsung Galaxy Note 7 units have been removed from retail stores across the world and has started a voluntary recall of the phones (Image: Imgur)

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is in spotlight these days. The reason: Galaxy Note 7’s battery has been exploding for users globally. The Koran smartphone maker admitted to have come across more than two dozen such cases as of September 1. Following the fiasco, Samsung issued a statement announcing an exchange program that will allow users to swap their Note 7’s with Galaxy S7 or S7 edge in the US. Samsung Galaxy Note 7 units have been removed from retail stores across the world, with the company urging customers not to use the smartphone.

Now, reports claim Samsung is plans to release a software update for the smartphone that will limit the battery recharge to under 60 per cent. Samsung wants to restrict the charge to 60 per cent at all times to avoid overheating, which may lead to battery explosion eventually. However, there’s no clear time-frame on when the company will actually roll out the update for users. Meanwhile, Samsung has said it will launch an advertisement across major media platforms to apologise for the faulty batteries in Galaxy Note 7. According to an IANS report, Samsung plans to say the following in the ads: “We apologise for causing discomfort and concern to our customers. All Samsung employees will do our best to resolve problems.”

Analysts have predicted recalling 2.5 million units of the Note 7 will cost Samsung around $1 billion. Even as Samsung continues to take measures to prevent the use of Note 7 across the world, reports of people getting injured due to the device’s battery explosion continue to pour in. Let us take a look at everything that has happened so far:

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 launch

Samsung, Samsung Galaxy Note 7, Galaxy note 7 overheating, Galaxy note 7 recall, Galaxy note7, Galaxy note 7 explosion, galaxy note 7 fire, galaxy note 7 issues, smartphone, technology, technology news, indian express Samsung, at the time of Note 7’s launch, expected to sell 14 million units globally, which has been cut down to 10 million now

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is company’s flagship smartphone, and it was unveiled globally on August 2. It packs high-end specifications: a 5.7-inch Quad HD (2560 x 1440 pixels) dual edge Super AMOLED display, Exynos processor, 4GB RAM, 64GB internal memory and up to 256GB expandable storage. The smartphone was touted as Apple iPhone 7’s competitor.

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 battery issues start to surface

Soon after its launch, reports of users complaining of Galaxy Note 7’s battery exploding while charging started making rounds online. Samsung released an official statement saying 35 such cases have been reported globally and that the company is conducting a thorough inspection to identify affected batteries. Samsung’s statement reads: “To date (as of September 1) there have been 35 cases that have been reported globally and we are currently conducting a thorough inspection with our suppliers to identify possible affected batteries in the market. However, because our customers’ safety is an absolute priority at Samsung, we have stopped sales of the Galaxy Note7. For customers who already have Galaxy Note7 devices, we will voluntarily replace their current device with a new one over the coming weeks.”

Samsung, at the time of Note 7’s launch, expected to sell 14 million units globally, which has been cut down to 10 million now. Sales of Note 7 are further expected to go down, due to the whole battery fiasco. Samsung has already faced a loss of close to $1 billion as it recalled 2.5 million units of Note 7 globally.

US FAA issues warning

Following reports of Note 7’s battery exploding during charging, US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an official warning saying the phone should not be switched on or charged during a flight. FAA also issued a directive on the use of the Note 7 and its storage in luggage. A statement on FAA’s reads, “In light of recent incidents and concerns raised by Samsung about its Galaxy Note 7 devices, the Federal Aviation Administration strongly advises passengers not to turn on or charge these devices on board aircraft and not to stow them in any checked baggage.”

Several airlines including Emirates, Qantas,Virgin Australia American, Delta, Air France, Virgin America and Virgin Atlantic have issued advisories related to the use of Galaxy Note 7 inside airplanes.

Close to 70 cases reported in the US

Health Canada recently issued a report that points to the fact that Samsung’s battery problems might be bigger than what it looks like. According to Health Canada’s statement, the number of cases reported in the US stands at 70. The statement reads, “Samsung Note7 smartphone battery has the potential to overheat and burn, posing a potential fire hazard. Health Canada and Samsung Canada have received one report of a phone battery overheating. No injuries have been reported. Samsung has received over 70 reported cases in the United States.”

Samsung plans to issue software update to restrict charge to 60 per cent

Now, Samsung seems to have finally found a solution to Note 7’s battery problems, which it hopes to tackle with a software update. According to an AP report, the software update will restrict Note 7’s charge to 60 per cent, preventing the smartphone from heating and reduce chances of exploding. However, it is unclear when the company plans to roll out the update as there’s no official word on it yet. The report adds that Samsung is in talks with mobile carriers to carry out the update plan.