Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014

Defending champion Andy Murray aims to repeat 2013

Andy Murray is watched by Amelie Mauresmo, his newly appointed coach, during a training session the day before the start of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships. (Source: Reuters) Andy Murray is watched by Amelie Mauresmo, his newly appointed coach, during a training session the day before the start of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships. (Source: Reuters)
Reuters | London | Posted: June 22, 2014 10:49 pm

Wimbledon welcomes back a British men’s singles champion for the first time in 78 years on Monday but Andy Murray says he will allow himself only a brief moment to milk the adulation before getting down to business.

Not since Fred Perry’s return as defending champion in 1936, when he went on to win retain the title in his last appearance at the tournament, has the All England Club been able to celebrate the achievements of a home favourite on the opening day of the championships.

After his momentous defeat of Serbia’s Novak Djokovic on the final Sunday last July, Murray has the honour of opening proceedings on Centre Court against Belgium David Goffin in what he hopes will be the first step to retaining his title.

“I think tomorrow (Monday), I need to enjoy that moment when I walk back on the court,” the world number five, told reporters.

“But as soon as I start playing the match it’s about trying to win. I enjoy winning. That’s it. I mean I don’t really want to go out on the court tomorrow and enjoy playing and then lose.

“It’s time when I get on the court to start concentrating, not think about last year. Concentrate on this year’s tournament, and that’s it.”

The 27-year-old Scot has made Centre Court his home in recent years. Since losing to Roger Federer in the 2012 men’s singles final he has been unbeatable on the hallowed turf, a run that has included an Olympic gold and a Wimbledon title.

Not since 2008 has Murray failed to reach the semi-finals at his home slam, with the vast majority of those victories coming on Centre Court.

Despite having withstood the huge pressure placed on his shoulders last year, however, Murray says there will still be plenty of butterflies in his stomach on Monday.

“I feel kind of similar,” he said. “I feel nervous, which is good. I like that. I don’t feel that different to last year.

“I think if you win a tournament like this, I feel like you get the benefits, you feel the benefits later in the tournament because you know what it takes and you know how to handle the latter stages of a tournament like this.

“But I think, always when you come back to a Grand Slam, there’s always nerves and pressure there before you start the event.”

Since that landmark win against Djokovic, not everything has gone to plan for Murray.

Back surgery ended his 2013 season after the U.S. Open and despite recovering well he has not found the same levels of consistency. He has also parted ways with coach Ivan Lendl, under whose guidance he became continued…

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