Friday, Oct 24, 2014

FIFA World Cup: Of underbelly, dancers

(Above) This mural by artist Paulo Ito is the talk of town for its anti-World Cup appeal. (Right) A TV channel records its official WC song, with anti-World Cup graffiti in the background (Source: Reuters/Express) (Above) This mural by artist Paulo Ito is the talk of town for its anti-World Cup appeal. (Right) A TV channel records its official WC song, with anti-World Cup graffiti in the background (Source: Reuters/Express)
Written by Aditya Iyer | Sao Paulo | Posted: June 9, 2014 2:18 am | Updated: June 9, 2014 9:50 am

This World Cup in Brazil has a face. The face is of a child; a black child. The child’s eyes are small, but they drop large tears. His greasy elbows rest on a crooked table, fists holding a fork and a knife upright. The child howls with hunger, despite a heap sitting on the plate in front of him. The heap is a large football.

This World Cup in Brazil has a face. And an underbelly.

Depicted on a nursery school facade in the rich and cozy environs of Pompeia, a high-end district in west Sao Paulo, the weeping-child-with-a-football-on-his-plate mural (although nameless, ‘Footbawl’ could just be a fair label) has resonated with the people — the Copa’s supporters and haters alike. And ever since the image went viral seconds after it was created last month by a graffiti artist named Paulo Ito, it has been the talk of town.

“We need to show the world and ourselves that the situation is not good,” Ito is quoted as saying by the U.S. magazine Slate. Local fame follows international recognition in this country. And with worldwide publicity, the mural has turned into a quasi-shrine, attracting several daily visitors to the escola.

One such pilgrim, on a sultry Saturday afternoon, is Carlito. He scrubs his stubble in silence and then reflects Kafka.

Rich, Free, Difficult

“Great art comes from deep suffering. Which is why Brazil, and especially Sao Paulo, has such a vibrant street art scene,” he says. But isn’t Sao Paulo mostly well off, I ask, at least as compared to the rest of the country? “Yes,” he replies. “But sometimes it is easier to be in chains than to be free. Sao Paulo is rich and free. Life is difficult.”

I leave Kafka 2.0 and Ito’s vivid mural behind to search for this most unique art-form, one that is said to be inspired by the suffering born from freedom. It doesn’t take me long to find what I’m looking for. A 25-minute walk down the ridge to Vila Madalena and I’m at Beco do Batman — a hamlet that gives any art gallery in this world a run for its finest frames.

Beco do Batman, or Batman Alley, is recommended by every Paulista and is an avant-garde artist’s finest dream. The street, shaped like a horse-shoe, is laced mainly by drinking holes, eateries and studio apartments. And every square inch of every wall raised around the walkabout is covered with stencil, spray or a sweeping brush-stroke.

“We are rather loud, as you can see,” says Joao, screaming over a bunch continued…

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