Friday, Sep 19, 2014
In this July 5 photo provided by the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano, Pope emeritus Benedict XVI, left, is welcomed by Pope Francis during a ceremony at the Vatican. The Vatican has cast doubt on the possibility that Argentine Pope Francis and his German predecessor would get together to watch their home teams in the WC final. (Source: AP) In this July 5 photo provided by the Vatican newspaper L'Osservatore Romano, Pope emeritus Benedict XVI, left, is welcomed by Pope Francis during a ceremony at the Vatican. The Vatican has cast doubt on the possibility that Argentine Pope Francis and his German predecessor would get together to watch their home teams in the WC final. (Source: AP)
Agence-France Presse | Rio De Janerio | Posted: July 13, 2014 2:45 am | Updated: July 13, 2014 10:12 am

A Germany side chasing a place in history will attempt to wreck Lionel Messi’s dream of a World Cup coronation with Argentina tomorrow as the month-long football carnival hits a climax at the Maracana Stadium. The 64th game of one of the best World Cups of all time pits Europe against South America — a duel between two football superpowers in one of the sport’s most evocative arenas.

Germany are attempting to become the first side from Europe to win a World Cup in the Americas, determined that a golden generation will finally gets it reward after a string of near-misses. Messi, meanwhile, is seeking the triumph which will silence forever the remaining critics who argue that the absence of a World Cup title precludes him from a place alongside Diego Maradona in football’s pantheon.

The momentum is firmly with Germany after their astonishing 7-1 semi-final demolition job of Brazil, through a combination of superb attacking play and defensive incompetence. Ominously for Argentina, Germany say they quickly put the win firmly in the ear-view mirror. All German eyes are now on the historic Maracana and a chance to claim the ultimate prize after losing in either the final or the semi-finals in their last four major tournaments.

“We enjoyed the game against Brazil, but we ticked it off after 24 hours,” said Germany striker Miroslav Klose.

That same steely determination has characterised Germany’s road to Rio, notably in coming from behind to snatch a 2-2 draw with Ghana in Group G and outlasting an awkward Algerian challenge in the last 16. They coolly neutralised a dangerous-looking France 1-0 in the quarter-finals and swiftly turned their attention to dismembering Brazil.

“As a player or a manager I have never seen a team celebrate a big victory so quietly,” German team manager Oliver Bierhoff said after the France win.

From top to bottom, the German spine has exuded quality. Manuel Neuer has looked unbeatable in goal while Mats Hummels has been a silky and solid presence in defence. Bastian Schweinsteiger and Sami Khedira have proved a formidable midfield duo, allowing the likes of Toni Kroos and Mesut Ozil to flourish.

Thomas Mueller has been a deadly goalscoring threat — five goals so far in the tournament — while the 36-year-old Klose has chipped continued…

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