Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014

Why BCCI hasn’t take any step against its chief — because it simply cannot

"If he (Srinivasan) resigns on his own, then a lot of problems might be solved". - Niranjan Shah (AP) "If he (Srinivasan) resigns on his own, then a lot of problems might be solved". - Niranjan Shah (AP)
Written by Shamik Chakrabarty | Kolkata | Posted: March 27, 2014 2:00 am | Updated: March 27, 2014 10:13 am

That it has taken no less than the country’s apex court’s intervention to push N Srinivasan closer to the exit door shows how defiant the cricket administrator has been in the wake of the IPL fixing scandal, and also how powerless the BCCI can be against its president.

For, the only manner to unseat a sitting BCCI president (without judicial intervention or unless his term expires) is if he voluntarily chooses to walk away. There is no provision of impeachment in the board’s constitution and the possibility has never been considered.

“We never thought that there could be a situation which might demand president’s ouster. So the clause has never been incorporated,” said former BCCI secretary Niranjan Shah.

“Members are waiting for tomorrow’s hearing and the subsequent court order. If he (Srinivasan) resigns on his own, then a lot of problems might be solved. Otherwise, let’s see what happens,” Shah said.

According to BCCI’s Memorandum of Rules or Regulations, a Special General Meeting (SGM), where, theoretically, a move to remove the president may be made, could be called “on a requisition signed by not less than 10 Full Members”.

However, the president has the power to cancel any such meeting at his sole discretion. In other words, even if there were enough numbers in the BCCI to convene a meeting where the possibility of his ouster could be discussed, Srinivasan would have the power to nip it in the bud.

This process explains the lack of such a move — or any vocal opposition — from within the board against Srinivasan so far. Till late Wednesday, the BCCI secretary Sanjay Patel hadn’t received any request of for convening a SGM, even though sources say that Srinivasan does not enjoy a majority support.

Tricky situation

Vice-president Ravi Savant agreed that the board was in a tricky situation.

“To start with, Srinivasan hasn’t been indicted anywhere. He, himself, has done nothing wrong,” he said.

“Tomorrow we’ve a hearing and if the court comes up with an order then the BCCI has to follow that,” he said, regarding the Supreme Court hearing.

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