Eid al-Adha 2017: Significance, History, Traditions and Celebrations

Eid al-Adha is considered holier of the two Eids and also known as the sacrifice feast, as it is celebrated to honour the dedication and willingness of Ibrahim (Abrahim) to sacrifice his son as an act of submission on God's command.

By: Lifestyle Desk | New Delhi | Updated: September 2, 2017 1:16 pm
eid al-adha, bakrid, kurbani eid, nazam, muslims, festival, prayer, celebration, Allah, Ibrahim, sacrifice, submission, dedication, lord, Hajj, pilgrimage, Indian express, Indian express news Every year thousands of Muslims come together to offer Namaz and celebrate Eid al-Adha.(Source: File Photo)

Eid al-Adha, one of the two most celebrated festivals by Muslims all around the world falls on September 1-2 this year. In fact, it is considered holier of the two Eids and also known as the sacrifice feast, as it is celebrated to honour the dedication and willingness of Ibrahim (Abrahim) to sacrifice his son as an act of submission on God’s command.

According to legend, on being asked, Ibrahim was ready to sacrifice his beloved son, but seeing his commitment, Allah intervened and, instead, asked him to sacrifice something less dear to him. It was then that Ibrahim sacrificed an animal for Allah. In commemoration of this, every year on the day of Eid al-Aadha an animal is sacrificed. The animal is not completely consumed by the family instead it is divided in three parts. One is shared by the family, the other is distributed among relatives and neighbours, and the third part is given to the poor. According to tradition, no one should be left hungry on the day of Eid.

ALSO READ | Eid al-Fitr: Significance, History, Traditions and Celebrations

People offering Namaz during Eid (Source: File Photo)

Every year, Eid al-Adha falls on a different date as it depends on the Islamic Lunar calendar. As per the calendar, Eid-al Adha falls on the 10th day of Dhu al-Hijjah and falls approximately 11 days prior to the previous year’s Eid. Just like Eid al-Fitr, Eid al-Adha begins with a prayer of two rakats followed by a sermon. On the day of Eid al-Adha people come together and listen to a sermon at a Mosque. They buy and wear new clothes for the festival and visit their families and friends. Many sacrifice the animal goat, known as Quarbani, to symbolically represent the sacrifice of made Ibrahim.

In the period of Eid al-Adha, many Muslims travel to Mecca and places around Saudi Arabia to perform the Hajj pilgrimage.

 

 

For all the latest Religion News, download Indian Express App

    Live Cricket Scores & Results