View From The Right: Pinarayi in Crosshairs

His regime has seen “a series of political murders or violence” across the state.

Updated: March 8, 2017 12:52 am

The editorial in Organiser, ‘Killing Silence Over Kerala Killings’, attacks the Pinarayi Vijayan government for its “murder politics”, “of which Pinarayi’s own district Kannur is the epicentre”. When Vijayan took over as the chief minister, the editorial says, “he tried to project himself as a different man with development agenda”. However, his regime has seen “a series of political murders or violence” across the state. This violence targets not only his “political opponents, namely the RSS/BJP workers”, but also members of the Congress and Muslim League, people from all communities, especially Dalits, women and children, the editorial alleges.

“If that was not enough, P. Vijayan government took the decision to commute the sentences of 1,850 prisoners lodged in various jails in the state,” it says, adding that the decision was suspended following the “judicious intervention by the Kerala governor”. When Kerala is “emerging as a crime and rape capital of the country”, why has the “government preferred to stand for the convicted criminals is the pertinent question”. The editorial also notes the “allegations of revenge levelled by (former DGP) T.P. Senkumar”, and underlines at the poor investigation into the Jisha murder case and the Puttingal fire tragedy.

Pointing at the faith of Communists in violence, it quotes the “darling of all young Red terrorists Che Guevara”, who once confessed that “I really like killing”.

Target Chidambaram

Responding to the recent remarks of former home minister, P. Chidambaram, an article in Organiser says that “irrespective of claims and conspiracies by Abdullahs, P. Chidambaram can rest assured that Jammu & Kashmir will remain an integral part of India”. Chidambaram, the article claims, recently made some “ill-advised comments” on Kashmir that he had a sinking feeling that “India has nearly lost Kashmir”.

The article slams him for noting that JNU “faces an existential threat because its founding ideas are the diametric opposite of the founding ideas of the RSS-BJP dispensation”. “Chidambaram sidesteps the fact that a Congress government, of which he was a leading light, was in power when Afzal Guru was hanged,” it says.

Pointing at an event when “anti-national slogans were raised” at its campus last year, the article asks: “What is the ‘existential dilemma’ of the JNU the writer is alluding to? Is he lamenting the fact that why such a thing did not happen on February 9 this year?” It also criticises Congress leaders for saying that “Indian universities suffer from mediocrity”. “He became a Central minister in September 1985, no less than 32 years ago approximately,” it says and asks, “What was his contribution to the creation of the ecosystem in universities as it exists now?”

The women of ISRO

The cover story in Panchjanya, ‘Goddess of Science’, is on the women scientists of ISRO behind the recent satellite launch. “ISRO has recently created a world record by launching 104 satellites,” it notes, adding that a lot of credit for this goes to its women scientists. The report underlines the difficulties Indian women have traditionally faced in the field of science. These women scientists have not only created a balance between their career and families, they have also served the country. Women face prejudices in social life.” The report claims the contributions of women scientists are rarely remembered. “There is hardly any sphere of national life that does not have the presence of women,” it says, noting that still they face many hurdles. In the field of scientific research, women have not received proper opportunities commensurate with their abilities and contribution. India ranks low in terms of women employees in various scientific institutions.

Compiled by Ashutosh Bhardwaj

For all the latest Opinion News, download Indian Express App

    Live Cricket Scores & Results