Staking claims

Political parties frequently depend on appropriating the legacies of persons who were not mainstream.

Written by The Indian Express | Published: October 31, 2013 2:43 am

* This refers to ‘Where does Jagjivan Ram belong?’ by Badri Narayan (IE,October 29). Political parties frequently depend on appropriating the legacies of persons who were not mainstream. These are opportunist tactics of parties to garner votes from particular sections of the electorate. Jagjivan Ram is now been claimed by both the Congress,which neglected him,and the BSP,which refused to accept him as a Dalit leader.

— Abhishek Yadav

Mumbai

Lack of faith

* This refers to ‘Bhatkal’s aide Tehseen,5 bombers from Ranchi behind Patna blasts: Police’ (IE,October 29). Unfortunately,explosions and bomb attacks in India are not quite uncommon. Though we may have become desensitised to them,they are still horrific and cowardly acts that injure and kill innocent persons. No religion in the world sanctions the killing of innocent people. According to some reports,the recent bomb blasts in Patna were to seek revenge for the Muzaffarnagar communal clashes. We should attempt to arrest,try and convict the masterminds of such communal clashes and terrorist acts more efficiently and in a time-bound manner,in order to minimise revenge attacks. People’s faith in investigative and law-enforcement agencies is quite low.

— Azhar Jamal

Jaunpur

Bizarre demands

* The Congress party has requested the Election Commission to cover up lotus ponds because the lotus is the BJP’s election symbol. The EC had covered up statues of elephants in UP during the last state elections there because the elephant is the BSP’s symbol. The BJP may soon want the EC to make sure everyone keeps their hands in their pockets or wears gloves,lest people’s hands remind everyone of the Congress. Soon,cycles,brooms,sickles,hammers and lanterns may be banned. But how in the world is the EC going to cover up the rising sun?

— H. Parshuram

Mumbai

Wait and watch

* THIS refers to the article,‘NOTA not so bene’ by Alistair McMillan (IE,October 28). While the introduction of NOTA may not seem like a major electoral reform,or even consequential in the short term,it is still a welcome change. NOTA in its current form doesn’t have the bite to accompany its bark. The number of people choosing NOTA will not feed into the result of the election. However,with the passage of time,NOTA is sure to spur more substantial reforms and changes. Most importantly,NOTA will hopefully change the attitude of some of India’s more cynical citizens,who choose not to exercise their vote for want of more “suitable” candidates.

— Ajay Lingwal

Chandigarh

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