Letter to the Editor

Mamata has politicised every sphere of life,and even a barbaric nun rape case is termed a political “conspiracy”.

Published:March 19, 2015 12:47 am

Letter of the Week Award
To encourage quality reader intervention The Indian Express offers the Letter of the Week Award. The letter adjudged the best for the week is published every Saturday. Letters may be e-mailed to editpage @expressindia.com or sent to The Indian Express, 9&10, Bahadur Shah Zafar Marg, New Delhi -110002.

Letter writers should mention their postal address and phone number. The winner receives books worth Rs 1,000.

The Bengal plot
THIS refers to the editorial, ‘Church and state’ (IE, March 18). It would seem West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee does not desire the rule of law in the state. She has politicised every sphere of life,and even a barbaric incident like the rape of a nun in Nadia is termed a political “conspiracy”. This attitude in government and among state police has only encouraged criminals. Civilian protests demanding justice for the victim are but a natural expression of democracy. Banerjee should know she is constitutionally responsible for protecting women’s rights, dignity and choices, and cannot dismiss such protests as conspiracies.
— Uttam K. Bhowmik,
Tamluk

Minority report
THIS refers to the article, ‘I feel I am on a hit list’ by Julio Ribeiro (IE, March 16). It is a shame for Indian democracy that an upright police officer like Ribeiro feels threatened by recent events in various parts of the country. I agree with the views expressed by him. Hinduism is a way of life and no one organisation can claim ownership over it. Ancient Vedic shlokas invoke harmony and a universal spirit. Christians have made significant contributions to the development of modern India. The role played by them in education, health and community development is laudable. Therefore, I request Ribeiro not to attach undue importance to the utterings of some people. The secret to India’s success is unity in diversity.
— Kannan Raju
Bangalore

JULIO RIBEIRO left a lasting impression on Punjab by fighting militancy in the state and rehabilitating families devastated not only by terrorism but also the floods of 1988. His crusade against corruption at high levels is still remembered with admiration. His outcry against the attacks on the Christian community, to which he proudly belongs, points to the catastrophe that majoritarian extremists could lead India into. The Indian government is yet to take serious action against fundamentalists, rowdies, radicals and extremists responsible for bringing misery to patriotic, law-abiding Indian minorities. The exhortations of the American president, and now Ribeiro’s cry of distress, must be taken seriously. The recurrence of such incidents must be prevented. A sense of safety and equality must be restored to India.
— Surinderjit S. Sandhu
Amritsar

Final countdown
THE South Africans have always been an intimidating team at World Cups, despite carrying the “chokers” tag (‘Knockout blues’, IE, March 18). Now they have defeated Sri Lanka by nine wickets to make it to the semifinals. But the argument that World Cup history has not been kind to the Proteas carries weight. Now the countdown has begun. Let’s see which way the cookie crumbles.
— Azhar A. Khan
Rampur

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