September 16, 1977, Forty Years Ago: Attache stabbed

The assailant described by the police as an Australian aged 23, broke into the home of Colonel Iqbal Singh, 45, before dawn and plunged a dagger into the sleeping diplomat’s chest.

By: Editorial | Published:September 16, 2017 1:10 am
The assailant described by the police as an Australian aged 23, broke into the home of Colonel Iqbal Singh, 45, before dawn and plunged a dagger into the sleeping diplomat’s chest.

Hundreds of police, with a helicopter and tracker dogs, combed woods, hills and farms around Canberra in a search for a gunman who stabbed and attempted to kidnap India’s military attache and his wife. The assailant described by the police as an Australian aged 23, broke into the home of Colonel Iqbal Singh, 45, before dawn and plunged a dagger into the sleeping diplomat’s chest. He levelled a .22 calibre rifle at the injured military attache and his wife forcing them outside the house and into a car. Singh, blood seeping from the stab wound, was ordered to drive towards Cooma, a nearby snow resort. About 15 minutes later, Singh swerved the vehicle off the road. It ploughed down an embankment, through a group of trees before grinding to a halt. Despite his wound Singh, aided by his wife, who was in the back seat, grappled with their captor.

Farakka Agreement

India had virtually signed away its rights to commission the Farakka barrage without the consent of the Bangladesh government under a secret clause in a protocol to the agreement signed by the then prime minister, Indira Gandhi and the Bangladesh premier, Sheikh Mujibur Rehman, in May 1974, it is learnt. This far-reaching clause was part of the Indo-Bangladesh agreement of 1974 and entitles Bangladesh to shut down the barrage unless an agreement is reached on the sharing waters during the dry months. It is believed the Bangladesh government has used this clause as a lever in discussions on the sharing of the Ganga waters.

Coke May Stay

Coca Cola might continue business in India after all — but without making Coke. Discussions between a senior executive of the company and senior government officials have opened up the possibility of the company making a fresh application to continue business under the Foreign Exchange Regulation Act.

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